2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27159
Title:
Isaiah Berlin and the totalitarian mind
Authors:
Hatier, Cécile
Abstract:
One of the important—yet often underestimated—dimensions of the intellectual legacy of Isaiah Berlin is his contribution to the demystification of the totalitarian temptation in the twentieth century. This paper starts with an apparent paradox: Berlin is described as a major figure of the anti-totalitarian camp, yet his writings nowhere touch explicitly on the totalitarian regimes of his time. Nonetheless, it is argued that Berlin's notion of “monism,” and his unique insight into the totalitarian mind, are an indirect yet valuable contribution to the understanding of the appeal exercised by totalitarianism within the modern political imagination. Despite Berlin's highly contestable account of the origins of monism—which he situates in the Enlightenment movement—it is asserted that Berlin's denunciation of utopias remains very much pertinent in light of the emergence of new fundamentalist utopias in a post 9/11 world. Consequently, there are grounds from which to dismiss those claims according to which Berlin's work belongs to an age—that of the Cold War—unfamiliar to the present. (Ingenta)
Citation:
The European Legacy, 9(6): 767-782
Publisher:
London: Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Journal:
The European Legacy
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27159
DOI:
10.1080/1084877042000311617
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cele/2004/00000009/00000006/art00004
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
10848770; 14701316
Appears in Collections:
Europe: Trend and Transformation Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHatier, Cécile-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T19:13:10Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-20T19:13:10Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationThe European Legacy, 9(6): 767-782en
dc.identifier.issn10848770-
dc.identifier.issn14701316-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1084877042000311617-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27159-
dc.description.abstractOne of the important—yet often underestimated—dimensions of the intellectual legacy of Isaiah Berlin is his contribution to the demystification of the totalitarian temptation in the twentieth century. This paper starts with an apparent paradox: Berlin is described as a major figure of the anti-totalitarian camp, yet his writings nowhere touch explicitly on the totalitarian regimes of his time. Nonetheless, it is argued that Berlin's notion of “monism,” and his unique insight into the totalitarian mind, are an indirect yet valuable contribution to the understanding of the appeal exercised by totalitarianism within the modern political imagination. Despite Berlin's highly contestable account of the origins of monism—which he situates in the Enlightenment movement—it is asserted that Berlin's denunciation of utopias remains very much pertinent in light of the emergence of new fundamentalist utopias in a post 9/11 world. Consequently, there are grounds from which to dismiss those claims according to which Berlin's work belongs to an age—that of the Cold War—unfamiliar to the present. (Ingenta)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLondon: Routledge (Taylor & Francis)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cele/2004/00000009/00000006/art00004en
dc.subjectPolitical philosophyen
dc.subjectBerlin, Isaiahen
dc.subject20th centuryen
dc.subjectLiberalismen
dc.subjectLiberal theoryen
dc.subjectLibertyen
dc.subjectTotalitarianismen
dc.subjectMonismen
dc.subjectAnti-totalitarianismen
dc.titleIsaiah Berlin and the totalitarian minden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe European Legacyen
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