2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27096
Title:
Gender differentiation and the asymmetrical use of animate nouns in contemporary Czech
Authors:
Dickins, Tom
Abstract:
This article analyses the use of animate nouns in contemporary Czech, with detailed reference to the dictionary Slovník spisovné etiny pro kolu a veejnost. Special attention is paid to the existence of generic masculine forms, which may underscore traditional perceptions of the status of men and women in Czech society. The study is informed by sociolinguistic theory and provides an overview of some of the relevant tenets of feminist argument, but it is primarily concerned with the linguistic implications of lexical practice. The main conclusion is that Czech is formally well adapted to suffixation and that there may now be scope for more feminine derivatives to assert themselves. (Ingenta)
Citation:
The Slavonic and East European Review, 79(2): 212-247
Publisher:
Modern Humanities Research Association
Journal:
The Slavonic and East European Review
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27096
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mhra/see/2001/00000079/00000002/7902212; http://www.mhra.org.uk/Publications/Journals/seer.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
14790963
Appears in Collections:
Europe: Trend and Transformation Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDickins, Tom-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T18:38:19Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-20T18:38:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationThe Slavonic and East European Review, 79(2): 212-247en
dc.identifier.issn14790963-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27096-
dc.description.abstractThis article analyses the use of animate nouns in contemporary Czech, with detailed reference to the dictionary Slovník spisovné etiny pro kolu a veejnost. Special attention is paid to the existence of generic masculine forms, which may underscore traditional perceptions of the status of men and women in Czech society. The study is informed by sociolinguistic theory and provides an overview of some of the relevant tenets of feminist argument, but it is primarily concerned with the linguistic implications of lexical practice. The main conclusion is that Czech is formally well adapted to suffixation and that there may now be scope for more feminine derivatives to assert themselves. (Ingenta)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherModern Humanities Research Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mhra/see/2001/00000079/00000002/7902212en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mhra.org.uk/Publications/Journals/seer.htmlen
dc.subjectCzech languageen
dc.subjectAnimate nounsen
dc.subjectMasculinityen
dc.subjectWomen in societyen
dc.subjectSociolinguisticsen
dc.subjectFeminismen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectWest Slavic languagesen
dc.subjectNoun class languagesen
dc.subjectGender languagesen
dc.subjectMasculine termsen
dc.subjectFeminine termsen
dc.subjectLinguisticsen
dc.subjectLexicographyen
dc.titleGender differentiation and the asymmetrical use of animate nouns in contemporary Czechen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Slavonic and East European Reviewen
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