2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26897
Title:
Disciplinary Differences in Academic Web Presence – A Statistical Study of the UK
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike; Price, Liz
Abstract:
The Web has become an important tool for scholars to publicise their activities and disseminate their findings. In the information age, those who do not use it risk being bypassed. In this paper we introduce a statistical technique to assess the extent to which the broad spectrum of research areas are visible online in UK universities. Five broad subject categories are used for research, and inlink counts are used as indicators of online visibility or impact. The approach is designed to give more complete subject coverage than previous studies and to avoid the conceptual difficulties of a page classification approach, although one is used for triangulation. The results suggest that Science and Engineering dominate university Web presences, but with Humanities and Arts also achieving a high presence relative to its size, showing that high Web impact does not have to be restricted to the sciences. Research funding bodies should now consider whether action needs to be taken to ensure that opportunities are not being missed in the lower Web impact areas.
Citation:
Libri, 53 (4): 242-253
Publisher:
Walter de Gruyter
Journal:
Libri
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26897
Additional Links:
http://www.librijournal.org/pdf/2003-4pp242-253.pdf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0024-2667
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mike-
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Liz-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-19T16:45:54Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-19T16:45:54Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationLibri, 53 (4): 242-253en
dc.identifier.issn0024-2667-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26897-
dc.description.abstractThe Web has become an important tool for scholars to publicise their activities and disseminate their findings. In the information age, those who do not use it risk being bypassed. In this paper we introduce a statistical technique to assess the extent to which the broad spectrum of research areas are visible online in UK universities. Five broad subject categories are used for research, and inlink counts are used as indicators of online visibility or impact. The approach is designed to give more complete subject coverage than previous studies and to avoid the conceptual difficulties of a page classification approach, although one is used for triangulation. The results suggest that Science and Engineering dominate university Web presences, but with Humanities and Arts also achieving a high presence relative to its size, showing that high Web impact does not have to be restricted to the sciences. Research funding bodies should now consider whether action needs to be taken to ensure that opportunities are not being missed in the lower Web impact areas.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWalter de Gruyteren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.librijournal.org/pdf/2003-4pp242-253.pdfen
dc.subjectWeb impact factorsen
dc.subjectInformation disseminationen
dc.subjectWebometricsen
dc.subjectStatistical studyen
dc.subjectE-journalsen
dc.subjectWebsitesen
dc.subjectE-publishingen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.subjectAcademic websites-
dc.subjectHigher education-
dc.titleDisciplinary Differences in Academic Web Presence – A Statistical Study of the UKen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLibrien
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