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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Business School > Management Research Centre  > Reforming Further Education: the changing labour process for college lecturers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26766
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Title: Reforming Further Education: the changing labour process for college lecturers
Authors: Mather, Kim
Worrall, Les
Seifert, Roger
Citation: Personnel Review, 36 (1): 109-127
Publisher: Emerald
Journal: Personnel Review
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26766
DOI: 10.1108/00483480710716740
Additional Links: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1588969
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine how the labour process of further education lecturers has changed as a result of legislative reforms introduced in the early 1990s. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on labour process theory and emergent perspectives on “the new public management” to provide theoretical frameworks. Evidence is derived from research carried out at three FE colleges in the English West Midlands involving interviews with managers and lecturing staff, documentary material and a survey of lecturing staff employed in the colleges. Findings – Market-based reforms in this sector have resulted in the intensification and extensification of work effort for lecturers. This paper argues that these changes have been driven by the ideological underpinning of the reform process. Individual and collective acts of lecturer resistance have been insufficiently strong to prevent change from occurring and worker alienation has increased. Research limitations/implications – The case study method renders generalisability of findings difficult. Comparative studies in other localities and sectors are needed. Practical implications – The research indicates that the “new managerialism” – which has developed in the public sector – has created an increasingly alienated workforce and that the processes of change in many institutions have had negative outcomes. Originality/value – The research demonstrates and application of labour process theory, supported by empirical evidence, as a means for examining the changing experiences of a group of public sector workers and assessing the effect of the “new managerialism” on workers' experiences.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Further education
Organisational change
Public sector reform
ISSN: 00483486
00000000
Appears in Collections: Management Research Centre

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