University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Business School > Management Research Centre  > The impact of organizational change on the perceptions of UK managers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26764
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: The impact of organizational change on the perceptions of UK managers
Authors: Worrall, Les
Parkes, Carole
Cooper, Cary L.
Citation: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 13(2): 139-163
Publisher: Psychology Press (Taylor & Francis)
Journal: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Issue Date: 2004
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26764
DOI: 10.1080/13594320444000047
Additional Links: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/13594320444000047
Abstract: Redundancy, delayering, downsizing, and various other forms of organizational change have become increasingly prevalent. This article focuses on the impact of different forms of organizational change on managers' perceptions of the organizations they work within and the comparison between changes that involve redundancy and/or delayering and those that do not involve such changes. The literature has many accounts of the negative effects associated with redundancy and delayering, but are these effects unique to these types of change or are they a consequence of negative experiences of a range of organizational changes? Hypotheses were tested to assess, first, whether there are differences between different levels of management, notably between directors and nondirectors in the way they perceive organizational change, second, to assess how change has affected managers' perceptions of their organizations and their working lives, and third, to explore if different forms of change are associated with differences in managers' perceptions of their organizations “as a place to work”. Hypotheses were tested with data from a cross-sectional survey with 830 managers from the UK. Organizational changes include cost reduction and culture change programmes, delayering, mergers/demergers, outsourcing, redundancy programmes, and contract/ temporary workers. The analyses reported here indicate clearly that specific forms of change are associated with managers' reports of their experiences at work; some forms of change (notably redundancy and delayering) seem to have particularly damaging implications for managers' experiences in the workplace. The analyses also show that there is a difference in the way directors and nondirectors perceive the changes. Finally, the article considers strategies for ameliorating the effects of change including the role of HR.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Office and workplace
Organisational psychology
Organisational change
Redundancy
UK
Delayering
Managers
ISSN: 1359432X
14640643
Appears in Collections: Management Research Centre

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies