2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26412
Title:
Does grading method influence honours degree classification?
Authors:
Yorke, Mantz; Barnett, Greg; Bridges, Paul; Evanson, Peter; Haines, Chris; Jenkins, Don; Knight, Peter; Scurry, David; Stowell, Marie; Woolf, Harvey
Abstract:
Variation in mark-spread is very evident in degree classification data provided by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). Previous empirical investigations suggested that, at the level of the module, the spread of results might, in some subjects, be influenced by the method of grading (percentage marking or shorter grade-point scale). The availability of degree classification data from HESA made it possible to test whether the effect perceived at module level carried through to the honours degree classification. The empirically-generated hypothesis was that subjects characterised by a relatively narrow spread under percentage marking would show a wider spread when a grade-point scale of around 20 divisions was used, with the effect being detectable in honours degree classification data. The hypothesis was tested, using HESA data for academic years 1994-95 to 1998-99, on those new universities in England and Wales for which the existence of an institution-wide grading approach could be established. Tests were undertaken at the level of the HESA subject area, and at the more fine-grained level of the individual subject where numbers permitted. Results from the analyses are mixed. The analyses have probably been influenced by weaknesses in the way that HESA has collected award data, but nevertheless suggest lines for further inquiry into a matter that is of importance for equity within institutions (especially where modular schemes are being operated) and more broadly across the higher education sector.
Citation:
Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 27 (3): 269-279
Publisher:
Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Journal:
Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26412
DOI:
10.1080/02602930220138624
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/02602930220138624
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
02602938; 1469297X
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYorke, Mantz-
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Greg-
dc.contributor.authorBridges, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorEvanson, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorHaines, Chris-
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Don-
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorScurry, David-
dc.contributor.authorStowell, Marie-
dc.contributor.authorWoolf, Harvey-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-16T08:05:02Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-16T08:05:02Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 27 (3): 269-279en
dc.identifier.issn02602938-
dc.identifier.issn1469297X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02602930220138624-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26412-
dc.description.abstractVariation in mark-spread is very evident in degree classification data provided by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). Previous empirical investigations suggested that, at the level of the module, the spread of results might, in some subjects, be influenced by the method of grading (percentage marking or shorter grade-point scale). The availability of degree classification data from HESA made it possible to test whether the effect perceived at module level carried through to the honours degree classification. The empirically-generated hypothesis was that subjects characterised by a relatively narrow spread under percentage marking would show a wider spread when a grade-point scale of around 20 divisions was used, with the effect being detectable in honours degree classification data. The hypothesis was tested, using HESA data for academic years 1994-95 to 1998-99, on those new universities in England and Wales for which the existence of an institution-wide grading approach could be established. Tests were undertaken at the level of the HESA subject area, and at the more fine-grained level of the individual subject where numbers permitted. Results from the analyses are mixed. The analyses have probably been influenced by weaknesses in the way that HESA has collected award data, but nevertheless suggest lines for further inquiry into a matter that is of importance for equity within institutions (especially where modular schemes are being operated) and more broadly across the higher education sector.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/02602930220138624en
dc.subjectMark spreaden
dc.subjectDegree classification dataen
dc.subjectHigher Education Statistics Agencyen
dc.subjectHonours degree classificationen
dc.subjectNew universities in England and Walesen
dc.titleDoes grading method influence honours degree classification?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Educationen
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