Coalminers, Coalowners and Collaboration: The Miners' Permanent Relief Fund Movement in England, 1860-1895.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26327
Title:
Coalminers, Coalowners and Collaboration: The Miners' Permanent Relief Fund Movement in England, 1860-1895.
Authors:
Benson, John
Abstract:
British coal-mining history has long been influenced by the classic, conflictual view of industrial relations, according to which the history of the industry is best understood in terms of a courageous trade union leadership inspiring a united workforce in an unending struggle against self-interested and intransigent employers. Accordingly, it is the purpose of the paper to argue that the miners' permanent relief fund movement repays more serious attention than the conventional perspective allows. It will be shown that the movement attracted a large membership, and provided the mining community with a major source of compensation for industrial accidents. It will be suggested that the permanent relief funds owed their success not just to their administrative efficiency but to the collaborationist foundations upon which they were predicated. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Citation:
Labour History Review, 68(2): 181-194
Publisher:
Maney Publishing
Journal:
Labour History Review
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26327
Additional Links:
http://www.maney.co.uk/search?fwaction=show&fwid=181; http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/lhr;jsessionid=1kj73dl3096ej.alexandra?
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0961-5652
Appears in Collections:
Trade, Retailing and Consumption History Group; History

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBenson, John-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-15T15:05:09Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-15T15:05:09Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationLabour History Review, 68(2): 181-194en
dc.identifier.issn0961-5652-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26327-
dc.description.abstractBritish coal-mining history has long been influenced by the classic, conflictual view of industrial relations, according to which the history of the industry is best understood in terms of a courageous trade union leadership inspiring a united workforce in an unending struggle against self-interested and intransigent employers. Accordingly, it is the purpose of the paper to argue that the miners' permanent relief fund movement repays more serious attention than the conventional perspective allows. It will be shown that the movement attracted a large membership, and provided the mining community with a major source of compensation for industrial accidents. It will be suggested that the permanent relief funds owed their success not just to their administrative efficiency but to the collaborationist foundations upon which they were predicated. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManey Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.maney.co.uk/search?fwaction=show&fwid=181en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/lhr;jsessionid=1kj73dl3096ej.alexandra?en
dc.subjectBusiness historyen
dc.subjectEnglish historyen
dc.subjectCoal miningen
dc.subjectPit clubsen
dc.subjectCoal ownersen
dc.subjectCompulsory insuranceen
dc.subjectSocial historyen
dc.subjectEconomic historyen
dc.subjectBritish historyen
dc.subjectMinersen
dc.subjectIndustrial accidentsen
dc.subjectLabour movementen
dc.subject19th centuryen
dc.titleCoalminers, Coalowners and Collaboration: The Miners' Permanent Relief Fund Movement in England, 1860-1895.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLabour History Reviewen
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.