2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26161
Title:
Slippery slopes and civil libertarian pessimism
Authors:
Waddington, P. A. J.
Abstract:
Civil libertarian accounts of the perilous state of civil liberties in modern liberal democracies are partial and unduly pessimistic, suggesting that the inevitable future for civil liberties can only be erosion. The concept of 'normalisation' purports to explain this erosion, but whilst examples of 'normalisation' are commonplace, contrary examples are equally prevalent but remain unacknowledged. This article proposes an equally plausible optimistic corrective to such pessimism, for civil libertarians have in the past successfully resisted and reversed the authoritarian instincts of governments faced with exceptional circumstances. They have done so overtly through the passage of legislation that has extended and enhanced civil liberties, such as the British Human Rights Act. They have also done so more quietly through the repeal of antiquated draconian legislation. In addition, civil libertarian pessimists exaggerate the illiberal predispositions of officials and police. Civil libertarian pessimism is good politics, but poor analysis. It testifies to the contested terrain over which the 'struggle for civil liberties' is fought.
Citation:
Policing & Society, 15(3): 353-375
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
Policing & Society
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26161
DOI:
10.1080/13557850500169204
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/13557850500169204
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
10439463; 14772728
Appears in Collections:
Policy Research Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWaddington, P. A. J.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-15T10:47:56Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-15T10:47:56Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationPolicing & Society, 15(3): 353-375en
dc.identifier.issn10439463-
dc.identifier.issn14772728-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13557850500169204-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26161-
dc.description.abstractCivil libertarian accounts of the perilous state of civil liberties in modern liberal democracies are partial and unduly pessimistic, suggesting that the inevitable future for civil liberties can only be erosion. The concept of 'normalisation' purports to explain this erosion, but whilst examples of 'normalisation' are commonplace, contrary examples are equally prevalent but remain unacknowledged. This article proposes an equally plausible optimistic corrective to such pessimism, for civil libertarians have in the past successfully resisted and reversed the authoritarian instincts of governments faced with exceptional circumstances. They have done so overtly through the passage of legislation that has extended and enhanced civil liberties, such as the British Human Rights Act. They have also done so more quietly through the repeal of antiquated draconian legislation. In addition, civil libertarian pessimists exaggerate the illiberal predispositions of officials and police. Civil libertarian pessimism is good politics, but poor analysis. It testifies to the contested terrain over which the 'struggle for civil liberties' is fought.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/13557850500169204en
dc.subjectCivil libertiesen
dc.subjectNormalisationen
dc.subjectProtesten
dc.subjectSocial movementsen
dc.subjectHuman Rights Act 1998en
dc.titleSlippery slopes and civil libertarian pessimismen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPolicing & Societyen
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