University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Law, Social Sciences and Communications > School of Legal Studies > Legal Studies Research Group  > Terrorism and Mental Illness: Is There A Relationship?

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26156
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Terrorism and Mental Illness: Is There A Relationship?
Authors: Weatherston, David
Moran, Jonathan
Citation: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 47(6): 698-713
Publisher: Sage Publications
Journal: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Issue Date: 2003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/26156
DOI: 10.1177/0306624X03257244
Additional Links: http://ijo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/47/6/698
http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=141554231&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Abstract: This article examines the connections between mental illness and terrorism. Most social scientists have discounted a causal relationship between mental illness and terrorism. This is not necessarily always the case within terrorism studies, the media, or political circles where the psychology of terrorism is often expressed in the language of mentalisms, and theories of pathologisation continue to exist. This article reaffirms the view that apart from certain pathological cases, there is no causal connection between an individual’s mental disorder and engagement in terrorist activity. The individual terrorist’s motivations can be explained by other factors, including behavioural psychology. However, there may be a connection between an individual engaging in terrorist activity and developing a mental disorder[s]. Certain stressors that occur because of terrorist activity may result in psychological disturbance in terrorist individuals. These factors may partially explain terrorist group instability and should be taken into account when detaining and interrogating terrorist suspects.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Terrorism
Terrorist psychology
Abnormal psychology
Mental illness
Criminal psychology
ISSN: 0306624X
Appears in Collections: Legal Studies Research Group
Legal Studies Research Group

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies