Did they jump or were they pushed? Reasons why minority ethnic trainees withdraw from initial teacher training courses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/25734
Title:
Did they jump or were they pushed? Reasons why minority ethnic trainees withdraw from initial teacher training courses
Authors:
Basit, Tehmina N.; Roberts, Lorna; McNamara, Olwen; Carrington, Bruce; Maguire, Meg; Woodrow, Derek
Abstract:
This article reports the findings of a research project which examines the reasons why minority ethnic trainees withdraw from teacher training courses. It highlights a number of issues, the most significant of which is that withdrawal is a process not an event. The most common causes of withdrawal were 'personal' and 'family' reasons. However, the combination of these two factors with various issues to do with the initial teacher training (ITT) institution and the placement school made it impossible for most trainees to stay on the course. With the exception of perceptions of racism by some minority ethnic trainees, the reasons for withdrawal given by majority ethnic and minority ethnic trainees were by and large the same. The article concludes by suggesting a number of strategies for ITT institutions and placement schools to improve the retention of trainees. It emphasises the need for better support from ITT institutions, more structured mentoring during school placements, continuous and effective communication between the ITT institutions and placement schools, flexibility in course structure, improved funding, availability of affordable childcare, and the tackling of discrimination. It also stresses that withdrawal is not necessarily final, and these trainees should be encouraged to return to teaching as many enjoyed the course and would make good teachers.
Citation:
British Educational Research Journal, 32(3): 387-410
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
British Educational Research Journal
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/25734
DOI:
10.1080/01411920600635411
Additional Links:
http://www.routledge.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01411926; 14693518
Appears in Collections:
Professional and Adult Learning

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBasit, Tehmina N.-
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Lorna-
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Olwen-
dc.contributor.authorCarrington, Bruce-
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Meg-
dc.contributor.authorWoodrow, Derek-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-13T10:38:39Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-13T10:38:39Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Educational Research Journal, 32(3): 387-410en
dc.identifier.issn01411926-
dc.identifier.issn14693518-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01411920600635411-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/25734-
dc.description.abstractThis article reports the findings of a research project which examines the reasons why minority ethnic trainees withdraw from teacher training courses. It highlights a number of issues, the most significant of which is that withdrawal is a process not an event. The most common causes of withdrawal were 'personal' and 'family' reasons. However, the combination of these two factors with various issues to do with the initial teacher training (ITT) institution and the placement school made it impossible for most trainees to stay on the course. With the exception of perceptions of racism by some minority ethnic trainees, the reasons for withdrawal given by majority ethnic and minority ethnic trainees were by and large the same. The article concludes by suggesting a number of strategies for ITT institutions and placement schools to improve the retention of trainees. It emphasises the need for better support from ITT institutions, more structured mentoring during school placements, continuous and effective communication between the ITT institutions and placement schools, flexibility in course structure, improved funding, availability of affordable childcare, and the tackling of discrimination. It also stresses that withdrawal is not necessarily final, and these trainees should be encouraged to return to teaching as many enjoyed the course and would make good teachers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.routledge.com/en
dc.subjectMinority ethnic groupsen
dc.subjectTeacher educationen
dc.subjectRetentionen
dc.subjectWithdrawal-
dc.titleDid they jump or were they pushed? Reasons why minority ethnic trainees withdraw from initial teacher training coursesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Educational Research Journalen
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