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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance > Modeling longitudinal changes in maximal-intensity exercise performance in young male rowing athletes.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/253037
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Title: Modeling longitudinal changes in maximal-intensity exercise performance in young male rowing athletes.
Authors: Mikulic, Pavle
Blazina, Tomislav
Nevill, Alan M.
Markovic, Goran
Citation: Modeling longitudinal changes in maximal-intensity exercise performance in young male rowing athletes. 2012, 24 (2):187-98 Pediatr Exerc Sci
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Journal: Pediatric exercise science
Issue Date: May-2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/253037
PubMed ID: 22728411
Abstract: The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of age and body size upon maximal-intensity exercise performance in young rowing athletes. Male participants (n = 171) aged 12-18 years were assessed using an "all-out" 30-s rowing ergometer test, and reassessed after 12 months. The highest rate of performance development, which amounts to [mean(SD)] +34%(23%) and +32%(23%) for mean and maximal power output, respectively, is observed between the ages of 12 and 13, while this rate of development gradually declines as the athletes mature through adolescence. Performance increases with body size, and mass, stature and chronological age all proved to be significant (all p < .05) explanatory variables of mean power output, with respective exponents [mean(SE)] of 0.56(0.08), 1.84(0.30) and 0.07(0.01), and of maximal power output, with respective exponents of 0.54(0.09), 1.76(0.32) and 0.06(0.01). These findings may help coaches better understand the progression of rowing performance during adolescence.
Type: Article
Language: en
ISSN: 1543-2920
Appears in Collections: Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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