Modelling handgrip strength in the presence of confounding variables: results from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/252777
Title:
Modelling handgrip strength in the presence of confounding variables: results from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey.
Authors:
Nevill, Alan M.; Holder, R L
Abstract:
Differences in handgrip strength, caused by risk factors such as physical inactivity, will be influenced by 'confounding' variables, e.g. age, body size. The aims of the study were to identify the confounding variables associated with handgrip strength and to assess the benefit that physical activity plays in maintaining grip strength within a population, having adjusted for differences in these confounding variables. The most appropriate linear body size dimension associated with grip strength was height rather than demispan. Non-linear associations with age and body mass were also identified. Handgrip strength peaked in the age group 25 - 34 years for male subjects and in the age group 35 - 44 years for female subjects. Similarly, handgrip strength increased with body mass until it peaked at a body mass of approximately 100 kg for male and 90 kg for female subjects; thereafter a rapid decline in grip strength was observed. Differences in handgrip strength were found to be significantly associated with levels of physical activity even having controlled for differences in age and body size (height, mass and percentage body fat), but the observed association was not linear. The level of physical activity necessary to maintain an optimal level of handgrip strength was found to be a balance of moderate or vigorous occasions of physical activity.
Citation:
Modelling handgrip strength in the presence of confounding variables: results from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey. 2000, 43 (10):1547-58 Ergonomics
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Ergonomics
Issue Date:
Oct-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/252777
DOI:
10.1080/001401300750003970
PubMed ID:
11083135
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0014-0139
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHolder, R Len_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-20T15:04:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-20T15:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2000-10-
dc.identifier.citationModelling handgrip strength in the presence of confounding variables: results from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey. 2000, 43 (10):1547-58 Ergonomicsen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0014-0139-
dc.identifier.pmid11083135-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/001401300750003970-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/252777-
dc.description.abstractDifferences in handgrip strength, caused by risk factors such as physical inactivity, will be influenced by 'confounding' variables, e.g. age, body size. The aims of the study were to identify the confounding variables associated with handgrip strength and to assess the benefit that physical activity plays in maintaining grip strength within a population, having adjusted for differences in these confounding variables. The most appropriate linear body size dimension associated with grip strength was height rather than demispan. Non-linear associations with age and body mass were also identified. Handgrip strength peaked in the age group 25 - 34 years for male subjects and in the age group 35 - 44 years for female subjects. Similarly, handgrip strength increased with body mass until it peaked at a body mass of approximately 100 kg for male and 90 kg for female subjects; thereafter a rapid decline in grip strength was observed. Differences in handgrip strength were found to be significantly associated with levels of physical activity even having controlled for differences in age and body size (height, mass and percentage body fat), but the observed association was not linear. The level of physical activity necessary to maintain an optimal level of handgrip strength was found to be a balance of moderate or vigorous occasions of physical activity.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Ergonomicsen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.subjectAllometric modelsen_GB
dc.subjectHeteroscedastic errorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshConfounding Factors (Epidemiology)en_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHand Strengthen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_GB
dc.titleModelling handgrip strength in the presence of confounding variables: results from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalErgonomicsen_GB

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