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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Exercise and Health > Circulating angiotensin converting enzyme activity is correlated with muscle strength.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/22860
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Title: Circulating angiotensin converting enzyme activity is correlated with muscle strength.
Authors: Williams, Alun G.
Day, Stephen H.
Folland, Jonathan P.
Gohlke, Peter
Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.
Montgomery, Hugh E.
Citation: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(6): 944-948
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Journal: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Issue Date: 2005
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/22860
PubMed ID: 15947718
Additional Links: http://www.acsm-msse.org/pt/re/msse/abstract.00005768-200506000-00007.htm
Abstract: PURPOSE: The D-variant of the angiotensin-1 converting enzyme (ACE) gene is associated with higher circulating and tissue ACE activity. Some studies have suggested a similar association of genotype with muscle strength or the gain in strength in response to training. This study has assessed the relationship between circulating ACE activity, strength, and the response to training. METHODS: Eighty-one untrained men were tested for quadriceps muscle strength, and 44 of these performed an 8-wk program of dynamic strength training of the quadriceps muscle group. Venous blood was obtained for assessment of circulating ACE activity before and after the training program. ACE genotype was also determined. RESULTS: At baseline, circulating ACE activity was significantly correlated with isometric (r = 0.25-0.29, P < 0.02) and isokinetic (r = 0.38, P < 0.0005) quadriceps muscle strength. ACE genotype also seemed to be related to pretraining muscle strength. However, circulating ACE activity showed no significant association with the 9-14% mean increases of muscle strength in response to the training intervention. ACE genotype also showed no association with the training-induced change in muscle strength. Circulating ACE activity did not change significantly after the training program. CONCLUSIONS: The data support a role for ACE in the regulation of human skeletal muscle strength, but do not confirm a role in altering the response to short-term training.
Type: Article
Language: en
MeSH: Adolescent
Adult
Exercise
Humans
Japan
Male
Muscle, Skeletal
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
ISSN: 0195-9131
Appears in Collections: Exercise and Health

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