University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School for Education Futures > Centre for Developmental and Applied Research in Education (CeDARE) > Professional and Adult Learning > An exploration of adult learners' perspectives of using Learndirect centres as sites for learning

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/22852
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: An exploration of adult learners' perspectives of using Learndirect centres as sites for learning
Authors: Dhillon, Jaswinder
Citation: Research in Post-Compulsory Education, 9(1): 147-160
Publisher: Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Journal: Research in Post-Compulsory Education
Issue Date: 2004
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/22852
DOI: 10.1080/13596740400200163
Additional Links: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=15125
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t716100718
Abstract: This article explores the experience of adult learners and their perceptions of learning using computer-based learning materials, mainly Learndirect packages. The findings are based on focus group interviews with learners in a range of settings, including centres in community-based organisations, further education colleges and private training providers based in the Midlands region of England. The research forms part of a larger study of partnership working and its role in widening participation in lifelong learning in the Black Country sub-region of England, but this article will focus specifically on the data from focus group interviews with learners. The findings reported here provide an insight into the ability of learners to articulate the benefits and the weakness of learning in this way, and to be clear about their learning goals. The data reveal aspects of the physical, social and psychological learning environment, which help learners participate in learning. This is, of course, useful for practitioners, but the individual stories also reveal deeper and more hurtful previous experiences, which cannot be tackled by tinkering with the learning environment or the learning materials.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Adult learners
Learndirect
Computer-based learning
Midlands region
Widening participation
Lifelong learning
ISSN: 13596748
17475112
Appears in Collections: Professional and Adult Learning

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies