Understanding the current diagnosis and management of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Qualitative Approach.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/209809
Title:
Understanding the current diagnosis and management of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Qualitative Approach.
Authors:
Wheen, Lucy Jane
Abstract:
Aims: The aim of this research was to engage with the experiences of professionals, parents, and young people in order to develop an understanding of the current diagnosis and management of ADHD. This research will be of interest to Counselling Psychologists working with the child and adolescent population and the clinical area of ADHD. Method: Nine semi- structured interviews were conducted with two young people, three parents, and four professionals. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the principles’ of grounded theory methods. A constructivist version of grounded theory was implemented, as outlined by Charmaz (2006) and a social constructionist epistemology was adopted. Analysis: A central story line of ‘investing in ADHD’ emerged. This involved the investment of resources in the ‘simple truth’ of ADHD as existing within the child’s brain. A number of categories emerged which contributed to this position, including the ‘battlegrounds’ which were fraught with struggles to gain control of children’s difficult to manage behaviours and ‘knowledge and understanding’ which highlighted the need to understand the nature of the perceived problems. In addition, ‘social expectations’ and ‘personal conflicts’ depicted the social and personal factors which served to construct the perceived problems. Conclusion: The investment in the ‘simple truth’ of ADHD appeared to hold the most meaning for those involved in the study. These findings offer utility for Counselling Psychologists wishing to engage clients in psychological formulation and management approaches which aim to address the underlying factors which influence ADHD.
Advisors:
Primrose,Yvette; Owens, Moira
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/209809
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate in Counselling Psychology Award: D. Couns. Psych.
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorPrimrose,Yvetteen
dc.contributor.advisorOwens, Moira-
dc.contributor.authorWheen, Lucy Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-07T14:46:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-07T14:46:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/209809-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate in Counselling Psychology Award: D. Couns. Psych.en
dc.description.abstractAims: The aim of this research was to engage with the experiences of professionals, parents, and young people in order to develop an understanding of the current diagnosis and management of ADHD. This research will be of interest to Counselling Psychologists working with the child and adolescent population and the clinical area of ADHD. Method: Nine semi- structured interviews were conducted with two young people, three parents, and four professionals. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the principles’ of grounded theory methods. A constructivist version of grounded theory was implemented, as outlined by Charmaz (2006) and a social constructionist epistemology was adopted. Analysis: A central story line of ‘investing in ADHD’ emerged. This involved the investment of resources in the ‘simple truth’ of ADHD as existing within the child’s brain. A number of categories emerged which contributed to this position, including the ‘battlegrounds’ which were fraught with struggles to gain control of children’s difficult to manage behaviours and ‘knowledge and understanding’ which highlighted the need to understand the nature of the perceived problems. In addition, ‘social expectations’ and ‘personal conflicts’ depicted the social and personal factors which served to construct the perceived problems. Conclusion: The investment in the ‘simple truth’ of ADHD appeared to hold the most meaning for those involved in the study. These findings offer utility for Counselling Psychologists wishing to engage clients in psychological formulation and management approaches which aim to address the underlying factors which influence ADHD.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Qualitative, Grounded Theory, Social Constructionism, Counselling Psychology.en
dc.titleUnderstanding the current diagnosis and management of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A Qualitative Approach.en
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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