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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > E-Theses > E-Theses > The Material Culture of the Household: Consumption and Domestic Economy in the Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/205017
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Title: The Material Culture of the Household: Consumption and Domestic Economy in the Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries
Authors: Caddick, Barbara
Advisors: Hussey, David
Publisher: University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date: 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/205017
Abstract: Research into the material culture of the household and the domestic interior has increased rapidly during recent years. It has primarily focused on the appearance and use of domestic space leaving household management and maintenance a neglected area of study. Furthermore the relationship between the ownership of goods, the domestic interior and the use of the home has not been studied in conjunction with the management and maintenance of the household. Additionally, research into the material culture of the household has predominantly focused on quantitative changes experienced during the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth. It has long been established that the ownership of household goods increased in this period, but similar research has not taken place to explore the nature of these goods, nor to extend this work to the subsequent period. This thesis brings these aspects of research together for the first time to create a synthesis between the ownership of goods and the changing nature and use of the home and household maintenance and management. The argument proposed here suggests that the changing nature of the material culture of the household and developments to the use of the home had an impact upon the way that the household was managed and maintained. The complex inter-woven relationship between the material culture of the domestic interior and the ways in which it was maintained and managed reveals that both elements were a part of an emerging middle class culture of domesticity. Therefore, this thesis makes a significant contribution to a holistic understanding of the household by looking at the ownership of goods and the use of domestic space within the context of maintenance and management.
Type: Thesis or dissertation
Language: en
Description: A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Keywords: Material Culture
Consumption
Household
Housework
Domestic Interior
Eighteenth century
Nineteenth century
Appears in Collections: E-Theses

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