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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Applied Sciences > Research Centre in Applied Sciences  > Agriculture Research Group > Bacterial synthesis of biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/20392
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Title: Bacterial synthesis of biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates.
Authors: Verlinden, Rob A. J.
Hill, David J.
Kenward, M.A.
Williams, Craig D.
Radecka, Izabela
Citation: Journal of Applied Microbiology, 102(6): 1437-1449
Publisher: Wiley InterScience
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/20392
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03335.x
PubMed ID: 17578408
Additional Links: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118490442/abstract
Abstract: Various bacterial species accumulate intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) granules as energy and carbon reserves inside their cells. PHAs are biodegradable, environmentally friendly and biocompatible thermoplastics. Varying in toughness and flexibility, depending on their formulation, they can be used in various ways similar to many nonbiodegradable petrochemical plastics currently in use. They can be used either in pure form or as additives to oil-derived plastics such as polyethylene. However, these bioplastics are currently far more expensive than petrochemically based plastics and are therefore used mostly in applications that conventional plastics cannot perform, such as medical applications. PHAs are immunologically inert and are only slowly degraded in human tissue, which means they can be used as devices inside the body. Recent research has focused on the use of alternative substrates, novel extraction methods, genetically enhanced species and mixed cultures with a view to make PHAs more commercially attractive.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Bacterial species
Synthesis
Polyhydroxyalkanoates
MeSH: Bacteria
Biocompatible Materials
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biotechnology
Carbon
Fermentation
Hydroxybutyrates
Industrial Microbiology
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Models, Biological
Plastics
Polyesters
ISSN: 1364-5072
Appears in Collections: Agriculture Research Group

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