The effect of walking on fitness, fatness and resting blood pressure: A meta-analysis of randomised, controlled trials

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/19352
Title:
The effect of walking on fitness, fatness and resting blood pressure: A meta-analysis of randomised, controlled trials
Authors:
Murphy, Marie H.; Nevill, Alan M.; Murtagh, Elaine M.; Holder, Roger L.
Abstract:
Objective. The purpose of this review was to perform a meta-analysis on walking intervention studies in order to quantify the magnitude and direction of walking-induced changes that may alter selected cardiovascular risk factors. Method. Twenty-four randomised controlled trials of walking were assessed for quality on a three-point scale. Data from these studies were pooled and treatment effects (TEs) were calculated for six traditional cardiovascular risk variables: body weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat, aerobic fitness (VO2 max in ml kg−1 min−1) and resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Weighted TEs were analysed using a random effects model with weights obtained using the inverse of the individual TE variances. Random effects models were used to investigate the influence of both study quality and exercise volume (<150 vs. ≥150 min week−1). Results. Random effects modelling showed that walking interventions increased VO2 max and decreased body weight, BMI, percent body fat and resting diastolic blood pressure in previously sedentary adults (p<0.05 for all). Conclusion. The results of this study provide evidence that healthy but sedentary individuals who take up a programme of regular brisk walking improves several known risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
Citation:
Preventive Medicine, 44(5): 377–385
Publisher:
Elsevier Science Direct
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/19352
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.12.008
Additional Links:
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622934/description
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Metadata only
ISSN:
00917435; 10960260
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Exercise and Health; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Marie H.-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorMurtagh, Elaine M.-
dc.contributor.authorHolder, Roger L.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-28T13:00:00Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-28T13:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationPreventive Medicine, 44(5): 377–385en
dc.identifier.issn00917435-
dc.identifier.issn10960260-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.12.008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/19352-
dc.descriptionMetadata onlyen
dc.description.abstractObjective. The purpose of this review was to perform a meta-analysis on walking intervention studies in order to quantify the magnitude and direction of walking-induced changes that may alter selected cardiovascular risk factors. Method. Twenty-four randomised controlled trials of walking were assessed for quality on a three-point scale. Data from these studies were pooled and treatment effects (TEs) were calculated for six traditional cardiovascular risk variables: body weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat, aerobic fitness (VO2 max in ml kg−1 min−1) and resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Weighted TEs were analysed using a random effects model with weights obtained using the inverse of the individual TE variances. Random effects models were used to investigate the influence of both study quality and exercise volume (<150 vs. ≥150 min week−1). Results. Random effects modelling showed that walking interventions increased VO2 max and decreased body weight, BMI, percent body fat and resting diastolic blood pressure in previously sedentary adults (p<0.05 for all). Conclusion. The results of this study provide evidence that healthy but sedentary individuals who take up a programme of regular brisk walking improves several known risk factors for cardiovascular disease.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Science Directen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622934/descriptionen
dc.subjectWalkingen
dc.subjectCardiovascular risken
dc.subjectFitnessen
dc.subjectBlood Pressureen
dc.subjectFatnessen
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen
dc.titleThe effect of walking on fitness, fatness and resting blood pressure: A meta-analysis of randomised, controlled trialsen
dc.typeArticleen
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