2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/18095
Title:
Embedding information skills on student learning: providing the models
Authors:
Bastable, Wendy; Morris, Pamela
Abstract:
This Phase 3 (evaluation and embedding) project has been developed from a highly successful earlier project: Embedding information skills on student learning: making the difference (2006). The earlier project produced a programme of information literacy skills, based on SCONUL’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which was delivered to two modules of first year students from the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences (HLSS) in bite-sized presentations at the end of their lectures. Importantly, it found that: “an effective Information Literacy programme delivered at the very beginning of Undergraduate life can contribute significantly to students’ ability to find, use and record information and increase their confidence regarding academic performance.” Bastable and Morris (2006). Valued by students, it clearly had a part to play in the learning experience of first year undergraduates and potentially in Schools’ retention and employability strategies. This was the impetus for a Phase 3 project which would test the information literacy programme on a more diverse range of students and subjects within HLSS and provide models which would encourage further take-up within the School and other Schools in the University. Other important outcomes from the previous project also needed to be carried forward and tested in a wider context: “We as librarians have been able to assess our approaches to the design and delivery of a structured Information Literacy programme. We have had the opportunity to work collaboratively as a team of librarians with academic staff and, crucial to the embedding process, earn important space on first semester, first year modules. We now know that the bite-sized sessions of information skills which are dove-tailed into existing lectures are a successful way to deliver the programme.” Bastable and Morris (2006). It was this combination of the following three features in Phase 2 which distinguished it from any other work being conducted in the field of information literacy: the partnership between academics and librarians, a structured information literacy programme and delivery in bite-sized sessions. So, it was these three crucial areas which would be put to the test in this current project by the delivery to an extended range of students.
Citation:
ILE Learning and Teaching Projects 2006/2007
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/18095
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=6939
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article was first published in the Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses (WIRE). There is no printed version.
Appears in Collections:
Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE); Staff Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBastable, Wendy-
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Pamela-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-12T12:19:19Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-12T12:19:19Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationILE Learning and Teaching Projects 2006/2007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/18095-
dc.descriptionThis article was first published in the Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses (WIRE). There is no printed version.en
dc.description.abstractThis Phase 3 (evaluation and embedding) project has been developed from a highly successful earlier project: Embedding information skills on student learning: making the difference (2006). The earlier project produced a programme of information literacy skills, based on SCONUL’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which was delivered to two modules of first year students from the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences (HLSS) in bite-sized presentations at the end of their lectures. Importantly, it found that: “an effective Information Literacy programme delivered at the very beginning of Undergraduate life can contribute significantly to students’ ability to find, use and record information and increase their confidence regarding academic performance.” Bastable and Morris (2006). Valued by students, it clearly had a part to play in the learning experience of first year undergraduates and potentially in Schools’ retention and employability strategies. This was the impetus for a Phase 3 project which would test the information literacy programme on a more diverse range of students and subjects within HLSS and provide models which would encourage further take-up within the School and other Schools in the University. Other important outcomes from the previous project also needed to be carried forward and tested in a wider context: “We as librarians have been able to assess our approaches to the design and delivery of a structured Information Literacy programme. We have had the opportunity to work collaboratively as a team of librarians with academic staff and, crucial to the embedding process, earn important space on first semester, first year modules. We now know that the bite-sized sessions of information skills which are dove-tailed into existing lectures are a successful way to deliver the programme.” Bastable and Morris (2006). It was this combination of the following three features in Phase 2 which distinguished it from any other work being conducted in the field of information literacy: the partnership between academics and librarians, a structured information literacy programme and delivery in bite-sized sessions. So, it was these three crucial areas which would be put to the test in this current project by the delivery to an extended range of students.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=6939en
dc.subjectInformation skillsen
dc.subjectStudent learningen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectEmbeddingen
dc.subjectInformation literacyen
dc.subjectProgramme modelsen
dc.titleEmbedding information skills on student learning: providing the modelsen
dc.typeArticleen
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