University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Institute for Learning Enhancement (formerly CELT) > Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE) > Reading for meaning

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/18073
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Reading for meaning
Authors: Clarke, Karen
Citation: ILE Learning and Teaching Projects 2006/2007
Publisher: University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/18073
Additional Links: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=6939
Abstract: This research was developed from a previous CELT project (2003/04 Focussed seminar groups, Clarke, 2004) in which students were asked to read a specific article and then discuss it in a seminar situation. It was noted was that students approached reading in different ways but in the main interacted with the text by marking it in particular ways. However, from working with different groups of undergraduate students, and discussing this with colleagues, the general feeling is that many students balk at reading academic literature. This is affirmed in research undertaken by Mateos et al. (2007) who found 93% of students on three different degree courses stated that the main source of accessing information came through oral exposition from the lecturer. In addition to the previous CELT research, a separate piece of research was undertaken as part of a CETL project which looked at how level 1 students approach academic writing (Clarke and French, 2007). Clearly, the link between efficient reading and appropriate levels of academic writing is undisputed; Wyse (2006:4) suggests that ‘(we) must learn to read like writers.’ Consequently, researching the process by which students assimilate their reading and apply it to their work seemed to be a natural evolution from the previous research projects.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: This article was first published in the Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses (WIRE). There is no printed version.
Keywords: Efficient reading
Reading approaches
Accessing information
Assimilation
Appears in Collections: Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE)

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
Clarke (2007).pdf51KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies