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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Effect of training on accumulated oxygen deficit and shuttle run performance.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/17072
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Title: Effect of training on accumulated oxygen deficit and shuttle run performance.
Authors: Ramsbottom, Roger
Nevill, Alan M.
Seager, R. D.
Hazeldine, R. J.
Citation: The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 41(3): 281-290
Publisher: Minerva Medica
Issue Date: 2001
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/17072
PubMed ID: 11533556
Additional Links: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11533556&query_hl=1
http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=024400918&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to investigate changes in physiological, metabolic and performance parameters resulting from an intense 6 week training programme. METHODS: Sixteen volunteers were divided into a control (CN; 4 men and 2 women) and training group (TR; 6 men and 4 women). Laboratory measures included maximal aerobic power (VO2max), submaximal oxygen uptake (10.5 percent or 6 degrees treadmill inclination) and accumulated oxygen deficit (AOD). Performance was assessed during 20 metre shuttle run tests (PST, progressive shuttle run test; HIST, high intensity shuttle run test). RESULTS: TR improved their HIST performance (m) significantly compared with CN, identified by a significant "group-by-training" interaction (p<0.01). Similarly, AOD values improved more in TR compared with CN (p<0.01). There was a trend for TR to further reduce blood pH values after training compared with CN, although this decrease (approximately 0.05 units) did not attain statistical significance. The change in AOD was strongly correlated with the change in run time to exhaustion (r=0.76, p<0.01) and the change in estimated total work output (r=0.69, p<0.01) during 10.5 percent gradient running and modestly correlated with the change in HIST performance (r=0.49, p<0.05, assuming a directional test). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest changes in the anaerobic capacity, determined as AOD, due to training may be reflected in corresponding changes in laboratory and field performance.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: Metadata only
Keywords: Female athletes
MeSH: Adult
Anaerobic Threshold
Analysis of Variance
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lactates
Male
Oxygen
Oxygen Consumption
Running
ISSN: 0022-4707
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Sport Performance
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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