2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/17072
Title:
Effect of training on accumulated oxygen deficit and shuttle run performance.
Authors:
Ramsbottom, Roger; Nevill, Alan M.; Seager, R. D.; Hazeldine, R. J.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to investigate changes in physiological, metabolic and performance parameters resulting from an intense 6 week training programme. METHODS: Sixteen volunteers were divided into a control (CN; 4 men and 2 women) and training group (TR; 6 men and 4 women). Laboratory measures included maximal aerobic power (VO2max), submaximal oxygen uptake (10.5 percent or 6 degrees treadmill inclination) and accumulated oxygen deficit (AOD). Performance was assessed during 20 metre shuttle run tests (PST, progressive shuttle run test; HIST, high intensity shuttle run test). RESULTS: TR improved their HIST performance (m) significantly compared with CN, identified by a significant "group-by-training" interaction (p<0.01). Similarly, AOD values improved more in TR compared with CN (p<0.01). There was a trend for TR to further reduce blood pH values after training compared with CN, although this decrease (approximately 0.05 units) did not attain statistical significance. The change in AOD was strongly correlated with the change in run time to exhaustion (r=0.76, p<0.01) and the change in estimated total work output (r=0.69, p<0.01) during 10.5 percent gradient running and modestly correlated with the change in HIST performance (r=0.49, p<0.05, assuming a directional test). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest changes in the anaerobic capacity, determined as AOD, due to training may be reflected in corresponding changes in laboratory and field performance.
Citation:
The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 41(3): 281-290
Publisher:
Minerva Medica
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/17072
PubMed ID:
11533556
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11533556&query_hl=1; http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=024400918&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Metadata only
ISSN:
0022-4707
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Sport Performance; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRamsbottom, Roger-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorSeager, R. D.-
dc.contributor.authorHazeldine, R. J.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-30T11:03:50Z-
dc.date.available2008-01-30T11:03:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 41(3): 281-290en
dc.identifier.issn0022-4707-
dc.identifier.pmid11533556-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/17072-
dc.descriptionMetadata onlyen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to investigate changes in physiological, metabolic and performance parameters resulting from an intense 6 week training programme. METHODS: Sixteen volunteers were divided into a control (CN; 4 men and 2 women) and training group (TR; 6 men and 4 women). Laboratory measures included maximal aerobic power (VO2max), submaximal oxygen uptake (10.5 percent or 6 degrees treadmill inclination) and accumulated oxygen deficit (AOD). Performance was assessed during 20 metre shuttle run tests (PST, progressive shuttle run test; HIST, high intensity shuttle run test). RESULTS: TR improved their HIST performance (m) significantly compared with CN, identified by a significant "group-by-training" interaction (p<0.01). Similarly, AOD values improved more in TR compared with CN (p<0.01). There was a trend for TR to further reduce blood pH values after training compared with CN, although this decrease (approximately 0.05 units) did not attain statistical significance. The change in AOD was strongly correlated with the change in run time to exhaustion (r=0.76, p<0.01) and the change in estimated total work output (r=0.69, p<0.01) during 10.5 percent gradient running and modestly correlated with the change in HIST performance (r=0.49, p<0.05, assuming a directional test). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest changes in the anaerobic capacity, determined as AOD, due to training may be reflected in corresponding changes in laboratory and field performance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMinerva Medicaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11533556&query_hl=1en
dc.relation.urlhttp://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=024400918&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine-
dc.subjectFemale athletes-
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnaerobic Thresholden
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.meshExercise Testen
dc.subject.meshExercise Toleranceen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen
dc.subject.meshLactatesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshOxygenen
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen
dc.subject.meshRunningen
dc.titleEffect of training on accumulated oxygen deficit and shuttle run performance.en
dc.typeArticleen

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