Long-term effects of grass ley set-aside on erosion rates and soil organic matter on sandy soils in east Shropshire, UK

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15864
Title:
Long-term effects of grass ley set-aside on erosion rates and soil organic matter on sandy soils in east Shropshire, UK
Authors:
Fullen, Michael A.; Booth, Colin A.; Brandsma, R.T.
Abstract:
The contribution of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ley set-aside to soil conservation and soil organic matter (SOM) content was investigated. Ten runoff plots (7–15°, 12–27% slope) at the Hilton Experimental Site, Shropshire, UK, were put to a grass ley in April 1991. Runoff and erosion rates during 9 years were low, despite the occurrence of potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0.24 ± 0.20% (±S.D.) of precipitation (n = 89 plot-years), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0.13 ± 0.04% on permanent (control) grassland. Mean erosion rate was 0.21 ± 0.14 t ha−1 year−1 (n = 69 plot-years). Erosion rate and slope were poorly correlated, suggesting leys are highly effective for soil conservation. Mean SOM content increased consistently and significantly on the set-aside plots from 20.4 g kg−1 in 1991 to 31.1 g kg−1 in 2001. Contrary to the usually strong relationship between SOM and clay content, the percentage silt exhibited a stronger correlation with SOM than percentage clay content. Furthermore, there were equally strong correlations between SOM and cumulative particle size fractions of both clay and silt contents. In the absence of significant quantities of clay in these sandy soils, silts assist binding of SOM, which has significance for assessing soil carbon sequestration potential.
Citation:
Soil and Tillage Research, 89(1): 122-128
Publisher:
Elsevier
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15864
DOI:
10.1016/j.still.2005.07.003
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TC6-4H16NT3-1&_user=1644469&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000054077&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1644469&md5=2f84b00faa4ef4684c53228332e7cc7e
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Metadata only
ISSN:
01671987
Appears in Collections:
Plant and Environmental Research Group; Construction and Infrastructure

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.-
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Colin A.-
dc.contributor.authorBrandsma, R.T.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-09T12:13:24Z-
dc.date.available2008-01-09T12:13:24Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationSoil and Tillage Research, 89(1): 122-128en
dc.identifier.issn01671987-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.still.2005.07.003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/15864-
dc.descriptionMetadata onlyen
dc.description.abstractThe contribution of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ley set-aside to soil conservation and soil organic matter (SOM) content was investigated. Ten runoff plots (7–15°, 12–27% slope) at the Hilton Experimental Site, Shropshire, UK, were put to a grass ley in April 1991. Runoff and erosion rates during 9 years were low, despite the occurrence of potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0.24 ± 0.20% (±S.D.) of precipitation (n = 89 plot-years), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0.13 ± 0.04% on permanent (control) grassland. Mean erosion rate was 0.21 ± 0.14 t ha−1 year−1 (n = 69 plot-years). Erosion rate and slope were poorly correlated, suggesting leys are highly effective for soil conservation. Mean SOM content increased consistently and significantly on the set-aside plots from 20.4 g kg−1 in 1991 to 31.1 g kg−1 in 2001. Contrary to the usually strong relationship between SOM and clay content, the percentage silt exhibited a stronger correlation with SOM than percentage clay content. Furthermore, there were equally strong correlations between SOM and cumulative particle size fractions of both clay and silt contents. In the absence of significant quantities of clay in these sandy soils, silts assist binding of SOM, which has significance for assessing soil carbon sequestration potential.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TC6-4H16NT3-1&_user=1644469&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000054077&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1644469&md5=2f84b00faa4ef4684c53228332e7cc7een
dc.subjectGrass ley set-asideen
dc.subjectRunoffen
dc.subjectSoil textureen
dc.subjectSoil erosionen
dc.subjectSandy soilsen
dc.subjectCarbon sequestrationen
dc.titleLong-term effects of grass ley set-aside on erosion rates and soil organic matter on sandy soils in east Shropshire, UKen
dc.typeArticleen
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