Antecedents of conflict in marketing's cross-functional relationship with sales

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15824
Title:
Antecedents of conflict in marketing's cross-functional relationship with sales
Authors:
Dawes, Philip L.; Massey, Graham R.
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model of the factors that explain the level of interpersonal conflict between marketing managers and sales managers. The paper aims to establish the overall level of interpersonal conflict in the full sample and in the two sampled countries (UK and Australia). Design/methodology/approach – The study draws on two theoretical frameworks to develop the model, namely structural contingency theory and the interaction approach. More specifically, the conceptual framework uses three groups of variables to explain interpersonal conflict: structural, individual, and communication. Importantly, the study developed and tested nine hypotheses. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the validity of the measures while OLS regression was used in testing the hypotheses. The data were collected from 200 sales managers in the UK and Australia. Findings – Overall, the study finds that there was a surprisingly low level of interpersonal conflict between marketing managers and sales managers and that there were no differences across the two countries. Of the three groups of variables, the two communication variables – frequency and bidirectionality – had the strongest effects on interpersonal conflict. The next strongest effects were from the individual-level variables – psychological distance and the sales manager's formal education. The findings also reveal that the level of the sales manager's marketing training and the marketing manager's sales experience had no influence on interpersonal conflict. Two of the three structural variables – use of lateral linkages and being part of a corporation – had the hypothesized negative impact on interpersonal conflict. Originality/value – This is the first study to use a large empirical survey to examine the marketing and sales dyad. Also, it is one of the few studies to test the effects of communication behviours on peer manager conflict.
Citation:
European Journal of Marketing, 39(11/12): 1327-1344
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15824
DOI:
10.1108/03090560510623280
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1523865; http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/03090560510623280
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Metadata only
ISSN:
03090566
Appears in Collections:
Management Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDawes, Philip L.-
dc.contributor.authorMassey, Graham R.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-08T13:43:03Z-
dc.date.available2008-01-08T13:43:03Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Marketing, 39(11/12): 1327-1344en
dc.identifier.issn03090566-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/03090560510623280-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/15824-
dc.descriptionMetadata onlyen
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model of the factors that explain the level of interpersonal conflict between marketing managers and sales managers. The paper aims to establish the overall level of interpersonal conflict in the full sample and in the two sampled countries (UK and Australia). Design/methodology/approach – The study draws on two theoretical frameworks to develop the model, namely structural contingency theory and the interaction approach. More specifically, the conceptual framework uses three groups of variables to explain interpersonal conflict: structural, individual, and communication. Importantly, the study developed and tested nine hypotheses. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the validity of the measures while OLS regression was used in testing the hypotheses. The data were collected from 200 sales managers in the UK and Australia. Findings – Overall, the study finds that there was a surprisingly low level of interpersonal conflict between marketing managers and sales managers and that there were no differences across the two countries. Of the three groups of variables, the two communication variables – frequency and bidirectionality – had the strongest effects on interpersonal conflict. The next strongest effects were from the individual-level variables – psychological distance and the sales manager's formal education. The findings also reveal that the level of the sales manager's marketing training and the marketing manager's sales experience had no influence on interpersonal conflict. Two of the three structural variables – use of lateral linkages and being part of a corporation – had the hypothesized negative impact on interpersonal conflict. Originality/value – This is the first study to use a large empirical survey to examine the marketing and sales dyad. Also, it is one of the few studies to test the effects of communication behviours on peer manager conflict.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1523865en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/03090560510623280en
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectConflicten
dc.subjectMarketing managersen
dc.subjectSales managersen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.subjectWorking relationships-
dc.subjectInterpersonal relationships-
dc.subjectCross-functional relationships-
dc.subjectOrganisational psychology-
dc.titleAntecedents of conflict in marketing's cross-functional relationship with salesen
dc.typeArticleen
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