2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15812
Title:
Inorganic polyphosphate in the origin and survival of species.
Authors:
Brown, Michael R. W.; Kornberg, Arthur
Abstract:
Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P), in chains of tens to hundreds of phosphate residues, linked by high-energy bonds, is environmentally ubiquitous and abundant. In prebiotic evolution it could have provided a flexible, polyanionic scaffold to assemble macromolecules. It has been conserved in every cell in nature. In prokaryotes, a major poly P synthetic enzyme is poly P kinase 1 (PPK1), which is found in 100 bacterial genomes, including numerous pathogens. Null mutants of PPK1, with low poly P levels, are defective in survival: namely, they show defective responses to physical/chemical stresses and predation. Pathogens with a PPK1 deletion are defective in biofilm formation, quorum sensing, general stress and stringent responses, motility, and other virulence properties. With the exception of Dictyostelium, PPK1 is absent in eukaryotes and provides a novel target for chemotherapy that would affect both virulence and susceptibility to antibacterial compounds. Remarkably, another PPK in Dictyostelium discoideum (PPK2) is an actin-related protein (Arp) complex that is polymerized into an actin-like filament, concurrent with its reversible synthesis of a poly P chain from ATP.
Citation:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 101(46): 16085-16087
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15812
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0406909101
PubMed ID:
15520374
Additional Links:
http://www.pnas.org/content/101/46/16085
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Metadata only
ISSN:
0027-8424
Appears in Collections:
Molecular Pharmacology Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Michael R. W.-
dc.contributor.authorKornberg, Arthur-
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-08T11:35:35Z-
dc.date.available2008-01-08T11:35:35Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 101(46): 16085-16087en
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.pmid15520374-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0406909101-
dc.identifier.otherhttp://www.pnas.org/-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/15812-
dc.descriptionMetadata onlyen
dc.description.abstractInorganic polyphosphate (poly P), in chains of tens to hundreds of phosphate residues, linked by high-energy bonds, is environmentally ubiquitous and abundant. In prebiotic evolution it could have provided a flexible, polyanionic scaffold to assemble macromolecules. It has been conserved in every cell in nature. In prokaryotes, a major poly P synthetic enzyme is poly P kinase 1 (PPK1), which is found in 100 bacterial genomes, including numerous pathogens. Null mutants of PPK1, with low poly P levels, are defective in survival: namely, they show defective responses to physical/chemical stresses and predation. Pathogens with a PPK1 deletion are defective in biofilm formation, quorum sensing, general stress and stringent responses, motility, and other virulence properties. With the exception of Dictyostelium, PPK1 is absent in eukaryotes and provides a novel target for chemotherapy that would affect both virulence and susceptibility to antibacterial compounds. Remarkably, another PPK in Dictyostelium discoideum (PPK2) is an actin-related protein (Arp) complex that is polymerized into an actin-like filament, concurrent with its reversible synthesis of a poly P chain from ATP.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciencesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pnas.org/content/101/46/16085-
dc.subjectInorganic polyphosphateen
dc.subjectPoly Pen
dc.subjectOrigin of speciesen
dc.subjectSurvival of speciesen
dc.titleInorganic polyphosphate in the origin and survival of species.en
dc.typeArticleen

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