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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Health & Wellbeing > Centre for Health and Social Care Improvement > ReGAE 2: primary eye care service utilisation and glaucoma: some viewpoints from African-Caribbeans in Birmingham UK

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15809
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Title: ReGAE 2: primary eye care service utilisation and glaucoma: some viewpoints from African-Caribbeans in Birmingham UK
Authors: Cross, Vinette
Shah, Peter
Bativala, Rustom
Spurgeon, Peter
Citation: Eye, 21: 912–920
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15809
DOI: 10.1038/sj.eye.6702461
PubMed ID: 16902494
Additional Links: http://www.nature.com/eye/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/6702461a.html
Abstract: Investigations into glaucoma awareness have drawn on informed, clinic-based populations. The paper reports a section of findings from a larger study that aimed to elicit the perceptions of those potentially less informed in community settings.MethodsA qualitative investigation used face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions with 48 African Caribbean participants outside the hospital eye-service. Interview data were transcribed and coded using manual and computer-aided methods. Inferences and interpretations were corroborated by discussion with expert advisors and community members not directly involved in the study.ResultsPositive attitudes to health promotion existed, but 'eye health' did not appear to be integral to individuals' health schemas. The capacity for primary eye care to enhance glaucoma knowledge appeared under utilised and inconsistent across modes of service delivery and was undermined by perceived conflicts of interest.ConclusionsEnhancing reciprocal understanding between service users and ophthalmic practitioners in primary care is central to developing flexible, responsive local eye-care services. The study suggested useful foci for cultural self-reflection and self-awareness on the part of health professionals themselves, in relation to glaucoma detection. Areas for further research are identified.Eye advance online publication, 11 August 2006; doi:10.1038/sj.eye.6702461.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: Metadata only
Keywords: Glaucoma
African-Caribbeans
Birmingham
UK
ISSN: 0950-222X
1476-5454
Appears in Collections: Centre for Health and Social Care Improvement

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