Facial Expressions of Emotion: Influences of Configuration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15394
Title:
Facial Expressions of Emotion: Influences of Configuration
Authors:
Cook, Fay
Abstract:
The dominant theory in facial expression research is the dual mode hypothesis. After reviewing the literature pertaining to the dual mode hypothesis within the recognition of facial identities and emotional expressions, seven experiments are reported testing the role of configural processing within the recognition of emotional expressions of faces. The main findings were that the dual mode hypothesis can be supported within the facial recognition of emotional expression. This and other more specific findings are then reviewed within the context of extant literature. Implications for future research and applications within applied psychology are then considered.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Dec-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/15394
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCook, Fay-
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-19T14:25:14Z-
dc.date.available2007-12-19T14:25:14Z-
dc.date.issued2007-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/15394-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Philosophyen
dc.description.abstractThe dominant theory in facial expression research is the dual mode hypothesis. After reviewing the literature pertaining to the dual mode hypothesis within the recognition of facial identities and emotional expressions, seven experiments are reported testing the role of configural processing within the recognition of emotional expressions of faces. The main findings were that the dual mode hypothesis can be supported within the facial recognition of emotional expression. This and other more specific findings are then reviewed within the context of extant literature. Implications for future research and applications within applied psychology are then considered.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectFacial expressionen
dc.subjectRecognitionen
dc.subjectConfigurationen
dc.subjectConfiguralen
dc.subjectEmotionen
dc.titleFacial Expressions of Emotion: Influences of Configurationen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral-
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