2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/14657
Title:
Cognitive appraisal of dissertation stress among undergraduate students
Authors:
Devonport, Tracey J.; Lane, Andrew M.
Abstract:
The present study examined changes in primary and secondary appraisal, and coping strategies utilized in the final weeks leading to dissertation submission. Sixty volunteer Sports Studies dissertation students (male: n = 29; female: n = 31) completed an adapted Cognitive Appraisal of Health Scale (CAHS: Kessler, 1998), and Brief COPE (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989) on 4 occasions over the 6 weeks before dissertation submission. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated a significant main effect for gender, with no main effect for changes over time and no significant interaction effect. Results demonstrated that males perceived the dissertation to be significantly more threatening and iess challenging than females. With regard to coping, males used more active coping, positive reframing, planning, and acceptance of the stressor, with lower scores for self-blame, venting of emotions, and behavioral disengagement. The results suggest that, for this student population, the dissertation did not become increasingly stressful in the period before submission. Clear relationships were also evidenced between primary appraisal, secondary appraisal, and coping. Future research should seek to identify factors that moderate the influence of situational stressors on coping responses among undergraduate students.
Citation:
The Psychological Record, 2006, 56: 259-266
Publisher:
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/14657
Additional Links:
http://www.siuc.edu/~ThePsychologicalRecord/index.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0033-2933
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDevonport, Tracey J.-
dc.contributor.authorLane, Andrew M.-
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-19T18:44:18Z-
dc.date.available2007-11-19T18:44:18Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationThe Psychological Record, 2006, 56: 259-266en
dc.identifier.issn0033-2933-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/14657-
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined changes in primary and secondary appraisal, and coping strategies utilized in the final weeks leading to dissertation submission. Sixty volunteer Sports Studies dissertation students (male: n = 29; female: n = 31) completed an adapted Cognitive Appraisal of Health Scale (CAHS: Kessler, 1998), and Brief COPE (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989) on 4 occasions over the 6 weeks before dissertation submission. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated a significant main effect for gender, with no main effect for changes over time and no significant interaction effect. Results demonstrated that males perceived the dissertation to be significantly more threatening and iess challenging than females. With regard to coping, males used more active coping, positive reframing, planning, and acceptance of the stressor, with lower scores for self-blame, venting of emotions, and behavioral disengagement. The results suggest that, for this student population, the dissertation did not become increasingly stressful in the period before submission. Clear relationships were also evidenced between primary appraisal, secondary appraisal, and coping. Future research should seek to identify factors that moderate the influence of situational stressors on coping responses among undergraduate students.en
dc.format.extent517406 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSouthern Illinois University, Carbondaleen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.siuc.edu/~ThePsychologicalRecord/index.htmlen
dc.subjectCognitive appraisalen
dc.subjectDissertationen
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectUndergraduate Studentsen
dc.titleCognitive appraisal of dissertation stress among undergraduate studentsen
dc.typeArticleen
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