2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/14626
Title:
Coursework Marks High, Examination Marks Low: discuss
Authors:
Bridges, Paul; Cooper, Angela; Evanson, Peter; Haines, Chris; Jenkins, Don; Scurry, David; Woolf, Harvey; Yorke, Mantz
Abstract:
It is commonly believed that the standard of student performance in coursework tends to be higher than that achieved in formal examinations. This view was tested by analysing undergraduate performances in six subjects at four UK universities. Two measures of relative coursework performance were employed. The first is the difference between the mean coursework and examination marks for each module. The second considers the proportion of students in each module who achieve a higher mark in the coursework than in the examination. The measures showed that in English and History coursework performances are slightly higher, equivalent to one-third of one honours class (or division) while, in Biology, Business Studies, Computer Studies and Law, coursework performances are higher by as much as two-thirds of one honours class (or division). The differences observed in the latter subjects are very significant and have serious implications for parity of treatment in degree programmes where students may choose modules with contrasting modes of assessment.
Citation:
Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education 2002, 27(1): 35-48
Publisher:
Routledge
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/14626
DOI:
10.1080/02602930120105045
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/rout~db=all
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Metadata only
ISSN:
02602938,1469297X
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBridges, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Angela-
dc.contributor.authorEvanson, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorHaines, Chris-
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Don-
dc.contributor.authorScurry, David-
dc.contributor.authorWoolf, Harvey-
dc.contributor.authorYorke, Mantz-
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-19T13:15:40Z-
dc.date.available2007-11-19T13:15:40Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education 2002, 27(1): 35-48en
dc.identifier.issn02602938,1469297X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02602930120105045-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/14626-
dc.descriptionMetadata onlyen
dc.description.abstractIt is commonly believed that the standard of student performance in coursework tends to be higher than that achieved in formal examinations. This view was tested by analysing undergraduate performances in six subjects at four UK universities. Two measures of relative coursework performance were employed. The first is the difference between the mean coursework and examination marks for each module. The second considers the proportion of students in each module who achieve a higher mark in the coursework than in the examination. The measures showed that in English and History coursework performances are slightly higher, equivalent to one-third of one honours class (or division) while, in Biology, Business Studies, Computer Studies and Law, coursework performances are higher by as much as two-thirds of one honours class (or division). The differences observed in the latter subjects are very significant and have serious implications for parity of treatment in degree programmes where students may choose modules with contrasting modes of assessment.en
dc.format.extent443174 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/rout~db=allen
dc.subjectAcademic performanceen
dc.subjectCourseworken
dc.subjectExaminationsen
dc.subjectStudentsen
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectHigher education-
dc.subjectUniversities-
dc.titleCoursework Marks High, Examination Marks Low: discussen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-
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