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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance > Effect of Leg Length on ROM, VJ and Leg Dexterity in Dance

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/139670
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Title: Effect of Leg Length on ROM, VJ and Leg Dexterity in Dance
Authors: Wyon, Matthew A.
Nevill, Alan M.
Dekker, K.
Brown, D. D.
Clarke, Frances
Pelly, J.
Koutedakis, Yiannis
Citation: International Journal of Sports Medicine, 31 (09):631
Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag
Journal: International Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date: 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/139670
DOI: 10.1055/s-0030-1254137
Additional Links: http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0030-1254137
Abstract: We investigated the associations between leg length and specific ballet movements in different skill groups. Volunteers were from an undergraduate dance programme (n=18), a pre-professional school (n=43) and from an elite classical ballet company (n=45). Individual data were collected for anthropometry, vertical jump, leg dexterity, and leg active and passive ROM. ANCOVA identified both main effects as significant with regard to vertical jump (gender P<0.001 and skill P=0.017); leg length was also identified as a significant covariate (P=0.023). Analysis of leg dexterity identified no significant effects with gender, skill or leg length. Active and passive range of motion noted gender (P=0.001) and skill (P<0.001) differences. Leg length was found to be negatively associated with both active and passive ROM (P=0.002). In conclusion, the present data highlight the diverse and conflicting effects of leg length on fundamental ballet skills. The longer legs that benefit vertical jump have a negative influence on range of motion and leg dexterity except for highly skilled skilled dancers, who through skill, seem to have overcome the effects of some of these dichotomies.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Anthropometric
Ballet
Tendus
Jump height
Flexibility
ISSN: 0172-4622
1439-3964
Appears in Collections: Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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