University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Applied Sciences > Research Centre in Applied Sciences  > Agriculture Research Group > Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from waste frying oil by Cupriavidus necator

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/139650
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from waste frying oil by Cupriavidus necator
Authors: Verlinden, Rob A. J.
Hill, David J.
Kenward, Melvin A.
Williams, Craig D.
Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia
Radecka, Iza K.
Citation: AMB Express1 (1):11
Publisher: Springer
Journal: AMB Express
Issue Date: 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/139650
DOI: 10.1186/2191-0855-1-11
Additional Links: http://www.amb-express.com/content/1/1/11
Abstract: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolymers, which can replace petrochemical plastics in many applications. However, these bioplastics are currently far more expensive than petrochemical plastics. Many researchers are investigating the use of inexpensive substrates derived from waste streams. Waste frying oil is abundant and can be used in PHA production without filtration. Cupriavidus necator (formerly known as Ralstonia eutropha) is a versatile organism for the production of PHAs. Small-scale batch fermentation studies have been set up, using different concentrations of pure vegetable oil, heated vegetable oil and waste frying oil. These oils are all rapeseed oils. It has been shown that Cupriavidus necator produced the homopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from the rapeseed oils. The achieved PHB concentration from waste frying oil was 1.2 g/l, which is similar to a concentration that can be obtained from glucose. The PHB harvest from pure oil and heated oil was 0.62 g/l and 0.9 g/l respectively. A feed of waste frying oil could thus achieve more biopolymer than pure vegetable oil. While the use of a waste product is beneficial from a life-cycle perspective, PHB is not the only product that can be made from waste oil. The collection of waste frying oil is becoming more widespread, making waste oil a good alternative to purified oil or glucose for PHB production.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: "Open access"
Keywords: Polyhydroxyalkanoates
Polyhydroxybutyrate
Bacterial fermentation
Biopolymer
Waste frying oil
Rapeseed oil
ISSN: 2191-0855
Appears in Collections: Agriculture Research Group

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies