University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > The demands of a working day among female professional ballet dancers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/129832
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: The demands of a working day among female professional ballet dancers
Authors: Twitchett, Emily
Angioi, Manuela
Koutedakis, Yiannis
Wyon, Matthew A.
Citation: Journal of Dance Medicine & Science, 14(4): 127-132
Publisher: J. Michael Ryan
Journal: Journal of Dance Medicine & Science
Issue Date: 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/129832
Additional Links: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?db=s3h&jid=%22GOO%22&scope=site
Abstract: Professional classical ballet dancers typically face long working days, and many complain of fatigue, particularly as a possible cause of injury. However, little information exists regarding the true physiological demands on dancers. The aim of the present study was therefore to ascertain the daily workload of professional female ballet dancers in terms of work intensity and rest data. Information regarding a single “work day” was obtained from 51 female dancers in one company using a multiple accelerometer. Data were examined for the amount of time spent at work intensities measured in metabolic equivalents (METS)deemed sedentary, low, moderate, and high, and the length of each period at rest. Results indicated significant differences between dancer rankings (corps de ballet, first artist, soloist, and principal) for mean exercise intensity and the percentage of time spent at sedentary intensity (< 3 METS), moderate intensity (3-6 METS) (p < 0.005), and vigorous intensity (6-9 METS) (p < 0.05). The ratios of time spent below 1.5 METS versus time spent above 1.5 METS (“rest” vs. “work”) were also significantly different (p < 0.001) between rankings. When rest periods throughout the working day were analyzed, 90% of dancers were found to spend less than 60 consecutive minutes resting at any one time; for 33.3% of dancers this was less than 20 minutes. Results also revealed significant differences (p < 0.05) between dancer rankings for the greatest amount of rest at any one time during the day. It was concluded that female professional classical ballet dancers’ ranking in their companies should be considered in devising work-rest schedules to help them to avoid fatigue and resultant injuries.
Type: Article
Language: en
ISSN: 1089-313x
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies