2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/129522
Title:
The effects of muscle damage on walking biomechanics are speed-dependent.
Authors:
Tsatalas, Themistoklis; Giakas, Giannis; Spyropoulos, Giannis; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Theodorou, Anastasios A.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis
Abstract:
The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of muscle damage on walking biomechanics at different speeds. Seventeen young women completed a muscle damage protocol of 5 × 15 maximal eccentric actions of the knee extensors and flexors of both legs at 60°/s. Lower body kinematics and swing-phase kinetics were assessed on a horizontal treadmill pre- and 48 h post-muscle damaging exercise at four walking speeds. Evaluated muscle damage indices included isometric torque, delayed onset muscle soreness, and serum creatine kinase. All muscle damage indices changed significantly after exercise, indicating muscle injury. Kinematic results indicated that post-exercise knee joint was significantly more flexed (31-260%) during stance-phase and knee range of motion was reduced at certain phases of the gait cycle at all speeds. Walking post-exercise at the two lower speeds revealed a more extended knee joint (3.1-3.6%) during the swing-phase, but no differences were found between pre- and post-exercise conditions at the two higher speeds. As speed increased, maximum dorsiflexion angle during stance-phase significantly decreased pre-exercise (5.7-11.8%), but remained unaltered post-exercise across all speeds (p > 0.05). Moreover, post-exercise maximum hip extension decreased (3.6-18.8%), pelvic tilt increased (5.5-10.6%), and tempo-spatial differences were found across all speeds (p < 0.05). Limited effects of muscle damage were observed regarding swing-phase kinetics. In conclusion, walking biomechanics following muscle damage are affected differently at relatively higher walking speeds, especially with respect to knee and ankle joint motion. The importance of speed in evaluating walking biomechanics following muscle damage is highlighted.
Citation:
European journal of applied physiology, 110(5): 977-88
Publisher:
Springer-Verlag
Journal:
European journal of applied physiology
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/129522
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-010-1589-1
PubMed ID:
20668871
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1439-6327
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTsatalas, Themistoklisen
dc.contributor.authorGiakas, Giannisen
dc.contributor.authorSpyropoulos, Giannisen
dc.contributor.authorPaschalis, Vassilisen
dc.contributor.authorNikolaidis, Michalis G.en
dc.contributor.authorTsaopoulos, Dimitrios Een
dc.contributor.authorTheodorou, Anastasios A.en
dc.contributor.authorJamurtas, Athanasios Z.en
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-13T11:07:19Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-13T11:07:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean journal of applied physiology, 110(5): 977-88en
dc.identifier.issn1439-6327-
dc.identifier.pmid20668871-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-010-1589-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/129522-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of muscle damage on walking biomechanics at different speeds. Seventeen young women completed a muscle damage protocol of 5 × 15 maximal eccentric actions of the knee extensors and flexors of both legs at 60°/s. Lower body kinematics and swing-phase kinetics were assessed on a horizontal treadmill pre- and 48 h post-muscle damaging exercise at four walking speeds. Evaluated muscle damage indices included isometric torque, delayed onset muscle soreness, and serum creatine kinase. All muscle damage indices changed significantly after exercise, indicating muscle injury. Kinematic results indicated that post-exercise knee joint was significantly more flexed (31-260%) during stance-phase and knee range of motion was reduced at certain phases of the gait cycle at all speeds. Walking post-exercise at the two lower speeds revealed a more extended knee joint (3.1-3.6%) during the swing-phase, but no differences were found between pre- and post-exercise conditions at the two higher speeds. As speed increased, maximum dorsiflexion angle during stance-phase significantly decreased pre-exercise (5.7-11.8%), but remained unaltered post-exercise across all speeds (p > 0.05). Moreover, post-exercise maximum hip extension decreased (3.6-18.8%), pelvic tilt increased (5.5-10.6%), and tempo-spatial differences were found across all speeds (p < 0.05). Limited effects of muscle damage were observed regarding swing-phase kinetics. In conclusion, walking biomechanics following muscle damage are affected differently at relatively higher walking speeds, especially with respect to knee and ankle joint motion. The importance of speed in evaluating walking biomechanics following muscle damage is highlighted.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen
dc.subjectIsokineticen
dc.subjectEccentric exerciseen
dc.subjectGait biomechanicsen
dc.subjectWalking velocityen
dc.subjectGait transitionen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnkle Jointen
dc.subject.meshBiomechanicsen
dc.subject.meshExercise Testen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGaiten
dc.subject.meshHip Jointen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshKnee Jointen
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subject.meshRange of Motion, Articularen
dc.subject.meshWalkingen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleThe effects of muscle damage on walking biomechanics are speed-dependent.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of applied physiologyen

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