Ankle and foot contributions to extreme plantar- and dorsiflexion in female ballet dancers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/129521
Title:
Ankle and foot contributions to extreme plantar- and dorsiflexion in female ballet dancers.
Authors:
Russell, Jeffrey A.; Shave, Ruth M; Kruse, David W.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A.
Abstract:
Background: Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion. The objective of this study was to quantify the relative contributions of the ankle and various foot joints to extreme plantarflexion (PF) and dorsiflexion (DF) in female ballet dancers using an X-ray superimposition technique and digital graphics software. Materials and Methods: One asymptomatic ankle was studied in each of seven experienced female ballet dancers. Three lateral weightbearing X-rays were taken of each ballet dancer's ankle: en pointe (maximum PF), in neutral position, and in demi-plié (maximum DF). Using graphics software, a subject's three X-ray images were superimposed and the tali were aligned. On each image the tibia, navicular, intermediate cuneiform, and first metatarsal were marked. Positional differences of a bone's line among the three images demonstrated angular movement of the bone in degrees. The neutral position was the reference from which both PF and DF of the bones were calculated. Results: The talocrural joint contributed the most motion of any pair of bones evaluated for both PF and DF, with mean movements of 57.6 ± 5.2 degrees en pointe and 24.6 ± 9.6 degrees in demi-plié. Approximately 70% of total PF and DF were attributable to the talocrural joint, with the remaining 30% coming from motion between adjacent pairs of the studied foot bones. Conclusion: Superimposed X-rays for assessing ankle and foot contributions to the extreme positions required of female ballet dancers offer insight into how these positions are attained that is not available via goniometry. Clinical Relevance: Functional information gained from this study may assist clinicians in assessessing ankle and foot pain in these individuals.
Citation:
Foot & ankle international, 32 (2):183-8
Publisher:
American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, Inc.
Journal:
Foot & ankle international
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/129521
DOI:
10.3113/FAI.2011.0183
PubMed ID:
21288419
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1071-1007
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Jeffrey A.en
dc.contributor.authorShave, Ruth Men
dc.contributor.authorKruse, David W.en
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-13T11:01:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-13T11:01:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationFoot & ankle international, 32 (2):183-8en
dc.identifier.issn1071-1007-
dc.identifier.pmid21288419-
dc.identifier.doi10.3113/FAI.2011.0183-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/129521-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion. The objective of this study was to quantify the relative contributions of the ankle and various foot joints to extreme plantarflexion (PF) and dorsiflexion (DF) in female ballet dancers using an X-ray superimposition technique and digital graphics software. Materials and Methods: One asymptomatic ankle was studied in each of seven experienced female ballet dancers. Three lateral weightbearing X-rays were taken of each ballet dancer's ankle: en pointe (maximum PF), in neutral position, and in demi-plié (maximum DF). Using graphics software, a subject's three X-ray images were superimposed and the tali were aligned. On each image the tibia, navicular, intermediate cuneiform, and first metatarsal were marked. Positional differences of a bone's line among the three images demonstrated angular movement of the bone in degrees. The neutral position was the reference from which both PF and DF of the bones were calculated. Results: The talocrural joint contributed the most motion of any pair of bones evaluated for both PF and DF, with mean movements of 57.6 ± 5.2 degrees en pointe and 24.6 ± 9.6 degrees in demi-plié. Approximately 70% of total PF and DF were attributable to the talocrural joint, with the remaining 30% coming from motion between adjacent pairs of the studied foot bones. Conclusion: Superimposed X-rays for assessing ankle and foot contributions to the extreme positions required of female ballet dancers offer insight into how these positions are attained that is not available via goniometry. Clinical Relevance: Functional information gained from this study may assist clinicians in assessessing ankle and foot pain in these individuals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, Inc.en
dc.subjectAnkleen
dc.subjectAnkle Jointen
dc.subjectFooten
dc.subjectSports Medicineen
dc.subjectDanceen
dc.subjectBalleten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnkle Jointen
dc.subject.meshDancingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFoot Bonesen
dc.subject.meshFoot Jointsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden
dc.subject.meshMathematical Conceptsen
dc.subject.meshSoftwareen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleAnkle and foot contributions to extreme plantar- and dorsiflexion in female ballet dancers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFoot & ankle internationalen

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