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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > Factors associated with home advantage in English and Scottish soccer matches

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/126806
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Title: Factors associated with home advantage in English and Scottish soccer matches
Authors: Nevill, Alan M.
Newell, Sue M.
Gale, Sally
Citation: Journal of Sports Sciences, 14 (2):181-186
Publisher: E. & F.N. Spon
Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date: 1996
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/126806
DOI: 10.1080/02640419608727700
Additional Links: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/02640419608727700&magic=crossref||D404A21C5BB053405B1A640AFFD44AE3
Abstract: Using the results from the end-of-season (1992-93) league tables, overall home advantage was confirmed in the eight major divisions of the English and Scottish football leagues. The degree of home advantage was found to vary significantly across the divisions. Furthermore, these divisional differences in home advantage were found to be significantly associated with the mean attendance of each division. In an attempt to understand these findings, every occurrence of two influential events (either a sending-off or penalty scored) reported in a national Sunday newspaper was recorded. The overall frequency of both sendings-off and penalties scored favoured the home side, but again this was not constant across the divisions. In divisions with large crowds, the percentage of home sendings-off was relatively small (30%), compared with no difference (50%) in divisions with smaller crowds. Similarly, the percentage of penalties scored by home sides in divisions with the largest crowds was large (> 70%), in contrast to little or no advantage in divisions with smaller crowds. Two possible explanations for these findings were proposed. Either larger crowds were able to provoke the away player into more reckless behaviour (real fouls), or influence the referee into believing that the away player had committed more fouls (perceived fouls).
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Crowd size
Mean attendance
Penalties scored
Sendings-off
ISSN: 0264-0414
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

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