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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Applied Sciences > Research Centre in Applied Sciences  > Plant and Environmental Research Group > High selectivity and affinity of synthetic Phillipsite compared with natural Phillipsite towards ammonium (NH4+) and its potential as a slow release fertilizer

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/125246
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Title: High selectivity and affinity of synthetic Phillipsite compared with natural Phillipsite towards ammonium (NH4+) and its potential as a slow release fertilizer
Authors: Jakkula, Vijay Sandeep
Williams, Craig D.
Hocking, Trevor J.
Fullen, Michael A.
Citation: Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, 57(1): 47–60
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Journal: Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science
Issue Date: 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/125246
DOI: 10.1080/03650340903211297
Additional Links: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/03650340903211297&magic=crossref%7c%7cD404A21C5BB053405B1A640AFFD44AE3
Abstract: Phillipsite (PHI) was synthesized in Na-K form, ion exchanged with NH4NO3 and compared with its natural counterpart. Zeolites were then characterized before and after ion exchange by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Ammonium exchanged Phillipsites were introduced as a soil amendment (2, 4 and 8% zeolite to soil loadings) to study the growth of maize (Zea mays) and compared with a control comprising NPK fertilizer added to soil. The affinity of the zeolite mineral Phillipsite for NH4+ in the presence of other cations is demonstrated by soil nutrient status. Results demonstrated that synthetic Phillipsite had a very high affinity towards NH4+ when introduced as a soil amendment, compared with its natural counterpart. Results were promising for ion exchange reactions in a zeolite-soil system, whereby cations present in soil exchanged for K+ more freely than NH4+ present in the synthetic Phillipsite framework.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Synthetic/natural Phillipsite
Ion exchange
High-selectivity
High-affinity
Slow/controlled release
ISSN: 0365-0340
Appears in Collections: Plant and Environmental Research Group

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