In support of research-based organisation change and development through professional partnerships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/11406
Title:
In support of research-based organisation change and development through professional partnerships
Authors:
Hamlin, Robert G.; Campbell, Fiona; Stewart, Jim; Reidy, Margaret
Abstract:
This paper provides a review and synthesis of current practice in the field of Organisation Change and Development (OCD). Five key 'failings' of managers contributing to the low success rate of OCD programmes are identified. To overcome these 'failings' a case is made for more evidence and research - based OCD practice, particularly OD initiatives informed and shaped by organisationally based research facilitated through 'university-organisation' professional partnerships of the kind advocated by Jacobs (1997). A framework conceptualising OCD Professional Partnerships is presented. This suggests an integrative and cyclical process connecting OCD research and consultancy which follow a similar sequence of stages with outcomes that are mutually beneficial and reinforcing. A UK example of an OCD Professional Partnership set within one part of the British Civil Service is presented which demonstrates how OCD practice can be profoundly influenced and enhanced by academically rigorous internal research. This is compared against a USA example set within a municipal government department. A number of common lessons are drawn of relevance to OCD practitioners and organisational leaders concerned with strategic change issues.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Jun-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/11406
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/uwbs_OP02-99%20Hamlin%20Campbell%20Reidy%20Stewart.pdf
Submitted date:
2007-04-26
Type:
Working Paper
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Working paper; OP002/99
ISSN:
1464-1747
Appears in Collections:
Management Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHamlin, Robert G.-
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Fiona-
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Jim-
dc.contributor.authorReidy, Margaret-
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-26T10:06:25Z-
dc.date.available2007-04-26T10:06:25Z-
dc.date.issued1999-06-
dc.date.submitted2007-04-26-
dc.identifier.issn1464-1747-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/11406-
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides a review and synthesis of current practice in the field of Organisation Change and Development (OCD). Five key 'failings' of managers contributing to the low success rate of OCD programmes are identified. To overcome these 'failings' a case is made for more evidence and research - based OCD practice, particularly OD initiatives informed and shaped by organisationally based research facilitated through 'university-organisation' professional partnerships of the kind advocated by Jacobs (1997). A framework conceptualising OCD Professional Partnerships is presented. This suggests an integrative and cyclical process connecting OCD research and consultancy which follow a similar sequence of stages with outcomes that are mutually beneficial and reinforcing. A UK example of an OCD Professional Partnership set within one part of the British Civil Service is presented which demonstrates how OCD practice can be profoundly influenced and enhanced by academically rigorous internal research. This is compared against a USA example set within a municipal government department. A number of common lessons are drawn of relevance to OCD practitioners and organisational leaders concerned with strategic change issues.en
dc.format.extent99522 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paperen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOP002/99en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/uwbs_OP02-99%20Hamlin%20Campbell%20Reidy%20Stewart.pdfen
dc.subjectOrganisational changeen
dc.subjectManagementen
dc.subjectCase studyen
dc.subjectManagersen
dc.titleIn support of research-based organisation change and development through professional partnershipsen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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