2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113827
Title:
Submaximal fatigue and recovery in boys and men
Authors:
Hatzikotoulas, K.; Patikas, D.; Bassa, E.; Hadjileontiadis, L.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Kotzamanidis, Christos
Abstract:
We examined the effects of a sustained submaximal isometric contraction on fatigue and recovery rates in untrained prepubescent boys and men. Fifteen prepubescent boys and 15 men executed an isometric plantar flexion at 20% of their maximal voluntary contraction for 10 min. During the fatigue protocol, surface electromyogram of the soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained. Following the fatigue protocol, maximal voluntary contraction data were also obtained every 3 min throughout a 15-min recovery period. During the fatigue protocol, agonist and antagonist surface electromyogram increased gradually to a similar extent in both groups. Following fatigue, torque and surface electromyogram during a maximal voluntary contraction decreased compared to prefatigue values and recovered in a similar manner in both groups. However, boys showed faster recovery in torque and surface electromyogram during the third minute of recovery period. It is concluded that a low-intensity sustained isometric fatigue protocol induces similar fatigue levels in boys and men. However, there is evidence that boys can recover faster than men.
Citation:
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 30 (10):741
Publisher:
Georg Thieme Verlag
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113827
DOI:
10.1055/s-0029-1224171
Additional Links:
http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0029-1224171
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0172-4622; 1439-3964
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHatzikotoulas, K.en
dc.contributor.authorPatikas, D.en
dc.contributor.authorBassa, E.en
dc.contributor.authorHadjileontiadis, L.en
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.contributor.authorKotzamanidis, Christosen
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-26T14:12:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-26T14:12:55Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sports Medicine, 30 (10):741en
dc.identifier.issn0172-4622-
dc.identifier.issn1439-3964-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0029-1224171-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/113827-
dc.description.abstractWe examined the effects of a sustained submaximal isometric contraction on fatigue and recovery rates in untrained prepubescent boys and men. Fifteen prepubescent boys and 15 men executed an isometric plantar flexion at 20% of their maximal voluntary contraction for 10 min. During the fatigue protocol, surface electromyogram of the soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained. Following the fatigue protocol, maximal voluntary contraction data were also obtained every 3 min throughout a 15-min recovery period. During the fatigue protocol, agonist and antagonist surface electromyogram increased gradually to a similar extent in both groups. Following fatigue, torque and surface electromyogram during a maximal voluntary contraction decreased compared to prefatigue values and recovered in a similar manner in both groups. However, boys showed faster recovery in torque and surface electromyogram during the third minute of recovery period. It is concluded that a low-intensity sustained isometric fatigue protocol induces similar fatigue levels in boys and men. However, there is evidence that boys can recover faster than men.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0029-1224171en
dc.subjectMuscle fatigueen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectIsometric contractionen
dc.subjectElectromyographyen
dc.titleSubmaximal fatigue and recovery in boys and menen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Medicineen
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