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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > Predictors of rehabilitation intention and behavior following anterior cruciate ligament surgery: an application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113808
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Title: Predictors of rehabilitation intention and behavior following anterior cruciate ligament surgery: an application of the Theory of Planned Behavior
Authors: Niven, A.
Nevill, Alan M.
Sayers, F.
Cullen, M.
Citation: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Issue Date: 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113808
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01236.x
Additional Links: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01236.x
Abstract: This study was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to assess the predictors of rehabilitation intention and adherence following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery in athletes. Participants (n=87; mean age=28.95 ±7.7 years) volunteered to participate following their first post-surgery physiotherapy session and completed the baseline measures of intention, attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy,participation level, sport and age. At follow-up, 48 participants returned completed rehabilitation diaries detailing adherence behavior every 2 weeks during an 8-week period. Results indicatedthat there was no significant difference in rehabilitation behavior at weeks 2, 4, 6 or 8. A multivariate analysis of covariance indicated that sport type, sport level, intention and intention2 significantly predicted rehabilitation behavior, although the strength of relationship varied across the weeks. Self-efficacy was a significant predictor of intention. These findings suggest that adherence behavior is predicted by sport type, participation level and curvilinearly by intention to adhere. Intention to adhere can be positively associated with enhanced self-efficacy. The study has highlighted issues that practitioners should be aware of when encouraging rehabilitation adherence. However, the TPB provided a poor fit for understanding adherence behavior in this setting.
Type: Article
Language: en
ISSN: 09057188
EISSN: 1600-0838
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

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