Developing journal writing skills in undergraduates: the need for journal workshops

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/11376
Title:
Developing journal writing skills in undergraduates: the need for journal workshops
Authors:
Hockings, Christine
Abstract:
In recent years, journal writing has become a popular tool for assessing student learning in Business Studies courses throughout UK universities. The writing-to-learn literature is full of the benefits of journal writing, not just as a means of assessing learning but as an essential part of the learning process itself. (Barclay, 1996; Borasi & Rose, 1989; Emig, 1987; Hogan, 1995; Holly 1987; Yinger & Clarke 1981, etc.). In the personal experience (as tutor) explored in this paper, however, journal writing failed to live up to expectations, both as a means of assessing the acquisition and application of subject specific knowledge, but also and more importantly, as a means of developing high level cognitive skills, such as reflection, analysis, critical thinking, evaluating, and hypothesising. In this paper I explain why journal writing failed to develop high level skills amongst a group of first year undergraduates in 1996. I then evaluate the effectiveness of a journal writing workshop designed to address high level skills amongst two similar groups of students in 1997.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/11376
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/uwbs_WP020-98%20Hockings.pdf
Submitted date:
2007-04-26
Type:
Working Paper
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Working paper; WP 020/98
ISSN:
363-6839
Appears in Collections:
Management Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHockings, Christine-
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-26T11:12:03Z-
dc.date.available2007-04-26T11:12:03Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.date.submitted2007-04-26-
dc.identifier.issn363-6839-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/11376-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, journal writing has become a popular tool for assessing student learning in Business Studies courses throughout UK universities. The writing-to-learn literature is full of the benefits of journal writing, not just as a means of assessing learning but as an essential part of the learning process itself. (Barclay, 1996; Borasi & Rose, 1989; Emig, 1987; Hogan, 1995; Holly 1987; Yinger & Clarke 1981, etc.). In the personal experience (as tutor) explored in this paper, however, journal writing failed to live up to expectations, both as a means of assessing the acquisition and application of subject specific knowledge, but also and more importantly, as a means of developing high level cognitive skills, such as reflection, analysis, critical thinking, evaluating, and hypothesising. In this paper I explain why journal writing failed to develop high level skills amongst a group of first year undergraduates in 1996. I then evaluate the effectiveness of a journal writing workshop designed to address high level skills amongst two similar groups of students in 1997.en
dc.format.extent-1 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paperen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWP 020/98en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/uwbs_WP020-98%20Hockings.pdfen
dc.subjectJournal writingen
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectStudy skillsen
dc.subjectStudent learningen
dc.subjectBusiness studiesen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.titleDeveloping journal writing skills in undergraduates: the need for journal workshopsen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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