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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > Passive smoking, asthma and allergy in children

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113488
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Title: Passive smoking, asthma and allergy in children
Authors: Metsios, Giorgos S.
Flouris, Andreas D.
Koutedakis, Yiannis
Citation: Inflammation & Allergy - Drug Targets, 8(5) ; 348-352
Publisher: Bentham Science Publishers
Journal: Inflammation & Allergy - Drug Targets,
Issue Date: 2009
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113488
Abstract: Despite the recent campaigns to eliminate smoking and hinder the detrimental effects of passive smoking (PS), actual smoking rates still increase worldwide. Several physiological systems, with the respiratory being the primary, are disrupted by PS and progressively deteriorate through chronic exposures. This is of particular importance in children, given that respiratory complications during childhood can be transferred to adulthood and leading to significantly inferior health profiles. Hence, it is no surprise that children that are exposed to PS either in-utero or during their adulthood may increase prevalence of allergies and asthma. However, investigating the acute effects of PS in children is inherently limited by complexities pertaining mainly to ethical constrains. Knowledge of the acute effects could be very important as it is the dose-dependant acute effects of passive smoking that lead to the long-term adaptations linked with the development of allergy and asthma. Current available data show that the chemical and carcinogenic constituents of tobacco have profound effects on children’s health as they may disrupt normal biological development. PS appears to have pronounced effects on respiratory parameters that promote asthma development and persistent wheezing rather than other allergies. As such, PS exposure has to be eliminated and researchers have to develop interventions for supporting smoking cessation as well as minimised PS exposure either this is in-utero or during childhood.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Children
Adolescence
Health
Allergy
Asthma
ISSN: 1871-5281
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

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