2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113486
Title:
Injuries, amenorrhea and osteoporosis in active females
Authors:
Myszkewycz, Lynn; Koutedakis, Yiannis
Abstract:
Menstrual abnormalities, and the associated osteoporotic disorders, are becoming increasingly common in females who are engaged in heavy training and exercise schedules. Such conditions may lead to a significant decrease in vertebral bone density, and an increase in injuries to the hip, ankle, foot, and wrist. In general, fracture frequency increases as bone mineral density decreases. Many researchers have linked various factors, including nutrition, low body weight, low caloric intake, hormonal status, and psychological and physiological stress, to the cause of amenorrhea. However, controversy still exists about the actual etiology of the disorder, although it is most probably multifactorial. Whatever the actual etiology, the frequency of bone-related injuries has increased dramatically over the last few decades along with the increased popularity of dance and sports and the increased demands placed upon both female dancers and athletes.
Citation:
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science 2(3): 88-94
Publisher:
J Michael Ryan
Journal:
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/113486
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1089-313x
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMyszkewycz, Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-19T14:08:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-19T14:08:54Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Dance Medicine & Science 2(3): 88-94en
dc.identifier.issn1089-313x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/113486-
dc.description.abstractMenstrual abnormalities, and the associated osteoporotic disorders, are becoming increasingly common in females who are engaged in heavy training and exercise schedules. Such conditions may lead to a significant decrease in vertebral bone density, and an increase in injuries to the hip, ankle, foot, and wrist. In general, fracture frequency increases as bone mineral density decreases. Many researchers have linked various factors, including nutrition, low body weight, low caloric intake, hormonal status, and psychological and physiological stress, to the cause of amenorrhea. However, controversy still exists about the actual etiology of the disorder, although it is most probably multifactorial. Whatever the actual etiology, the frequency of bone-related injuries has increased dramatically over the last few decades along with the increased popularity of dance and sports and the increased demands placed upon both female dancers and athletes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJ Michael Ryanen
dc.titleInjuries, amenorrhea and osteoporosis in active femalesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Dance Medicine & Scienceen
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