University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > Seasonal variations of injury and overtraining in elite athletes

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/111407
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Seasonal variations of injury and overtraining in elite athletes
Authors: Koutedakis, Yiannis
Sharp, N. C. Craig
Citation: Clinical journal of sports medicine 8(1): 18-21
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Journal: Clinical journal of sports medicine
Issue Date: 1998
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/111407
Abstract: Objective: To assess reported injuries and cases of overtraining in relation to training and competition cycles, aerobic versus anaerobic sport, and gender. Methods: A total of 163 elite male and 94 elite female athletes from eight different sports volunteered. They reported 212 musculoskeletal injuries and 38 cases of overtraining syndrome. These injuries and cases of overtraining were then arranged according to the training or competition cycle in which they occured, whether the sufferers were male or female athletes, and the metabolic characteristics of the sports in which the injuries and overtraining occurred. Results: The preparation (October to February), precompetition (March to May), and competition (June to August) cycles were associated with 9%, 19%, and 32% of the injuries reported by the men, respectively, and with 8%, 10%, and 22% of the injuries reported by women, respectively. For the same cycles, cases of overtraining were found to be 15%, 24% and 35% for the men, respectively, and 4%, 7%, and 15% for the women, respectively. For both men and women, the competition cycle proved significantly more injuries and incidents of overtraining than the preparation and precompetition cycles (p<0.005 vs p <0.005) in men, but not in women. Similarly, precompetion revealed significanly more injuries (p<0.005) in men, but not in women, compared with the preparation cycle. Also, male athletes reported a significantly higher number of injuries during the precompetion (p<0.005) and competition (p<0.001) cycles, and more cases of overtraining during the competion cycle (p<0.001) than did their female counterparts. No differences were found when the data were arranged according to dominant metabolic characteristics of the sports in which the injuries and overtraining occurred. Conclusion: Elite athletes are more likely to become injured or overtrained during the precompetition and, especially, competition cycles than in the preparation cycle. Parallel seasonal variations were also found when data were analyzed for aerobic versus anaerobic sport and gender.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Training and competition cycles
Sport injuries
Overtraining
Aerobic and anaerobic sports
Gender effects
ISSN: 1050642X
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies