2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/111297
Title:
Plyometric exercise increases serum indices of muscle damage and collagen breakdown.
Authors:
Tofas, Trifon; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Fatouros, Ioannis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Sinouris, Efstathios A; Papageorgakopoulou, Nickoletta; Theocharis, Dimitrios A
Abstract:
The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of acute plyometric exercise on indices of muscle damage and collagen breakdown. Nine untrained men performed an intense bout of plyometric jumping exercises (experimental group) and nine men remained at rest (control group). Seven days before and 24, 48, and 72 hours after plyometric exercise or rest, several physiological and biochemical indices of muscle damage and two biochemical indices of collagen damage were determined. No significant changes in concentric and eccentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors or flexion and extension range of motion were found after the plyometric exercise. Delayed-onset muscle soreness increased 48 hours after exercise. Creatine kinase increased 48 and 72 hours post exercise, whereas lactate dehydrogenase increased 24, 48, and 72 hours post exercise. Serum hydroxyproline increased 24 hours post exercise, peaked at 48 hours, and remained elevated up to 72 hours post exercise. Hydroxylysine (which was measured only before exercise and at 48 hours) was found increased 48 hours post exercise. No differences were found in any physiological or biochemical index in the control group. Intense plyometric exercise increased muscle damage, delayed-onset muscle soreness, and serum indices of collagen breakdown without a concomitant decrease in the functional capacity of muscles. Hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine levels in serum seem promising measures for describing exercise-induced collagen degradation. Coaches need to keep in mind that by using plyometric activities, despite the increased muscle damage and collagen turnover that follow, it is not necessarily accompanied by decreases in skeletal muscle capacity.
Citation:
Journal of strength and conditioning research, 22(2): 490-6
Publisher:
Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.
Journal:
Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/111297
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816605a0
PubMed ID:
18550965
Additional Links:
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=24&did=1548772931&SrchMode=3&sid=2&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1284733291&clientId=53702&aid=5
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1533-4287
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTofas, Trifonen
dc.contributor.authorJamurtas, Athanasios Zen
dc.contributor.authorFatouros, Ioannisen
dc.contributor.authorNikolaidis, Michalis Gen
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.contributor.authorSinouris, Efstathios Aen
dc.contributor.authorPapageorgakopoulou, Nickolettaen
dc.contributor.authorTheocharis, Dimitrios Aen
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T14:27:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T14:27:52Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of strength and conditioning research, 22(2): 490-6en
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287-
dc.identifier.pmid18550965-
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816605a0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/111297-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to examine the effect of acute plyometric exercise on indices of muscle damage and collagen breakdown. Nine untrained men performed an intense bout of plyometric jumping exercises (experimental group) and nine men remained at rest (control group). Seven days before and 24, 48, and 72 hours after plyometric exercise or rest, several physiological and biochemical indices of muscle damage and two biochemical indices of collagen damage were determined. No significant changes in concentric and eccentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors or flexion and extension range of motion were found after the plyometric exercise. Delayed-onset muscle soreness increased 48 hours after exercise. Creatine kinase increased 48 and 72 hours post exercise, whereas lactate dehydrogenase increased 24, 48, and 72 hours post exercise. Serum hydroxyproline increased 24 hours post exercise, peaked at 48 hours, and remained elevated up to 72 hours post exercise. Hydroxylysine (which was measured only before exercise and at 48 hours) was found increased 48 hours post exercise. No differences were found in any physiological or biochemical index in the control group. Intense plyometric exercise increased muscle damage, delayed-onset muscle soreness, and serum indices of collagen breakdown without a concomitant decrease in the functional capacity of muscles. Hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine levels in serum seem promising measures for describing exercise-induced collagen degradation. Coaches need to keep in mind that by using plyometric activities, despite the increased muscle damage and collagen turnover that follow, it is not necessarily accompanied by decreases in skeletal muscle capacity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics Publishers, Inc.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=24&did=1548772931&SrchMode=3&sid=2&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1284733291&clientId=53702&aid=5en
dc.subjectEccentricen
dc.subjectHydroxyprolineen
dc.subjectHydroxylysineen
dc.subjectStretch shortening cycleen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen
dc.subject.meshCollagenen
dc.subject.meshCreatine Kinaseen
dc.subject.meshExerciseen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHydroxylysineen
dc.subject.meshHydroxyprolineen
dc.subject.meshL-Lactate Dehydrogenaseen
dc.subject.meshLactic Aciden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Exertionen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshTorqueen
dc.titlePlyometric exercise increases serum indices of muscle damage and collagen breakdown.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen

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