Can greater muscularity in larger individuals resolve the 3/4 power-law controversy when modelling maximum oxygen uptake?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/11119
Title:
Can greater muscularity in larger individuals resolve the 3/4 power-law controversy when modelling maximum oxygen uptake?
Authors:
Nevill, Alan M.; Markovic, G; Vucetic, V; Holder, Roger L.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The power function relationship, MR = a.m(b), between metabolic rate (MR) and body mass m has been the source of much controversy amongst biologists for many years. Various studies have reported mass exponents (b) greater than the anticipated 'surface-area' exponent 0.67, often closer to 0.75 originally identified by Kleiber. AIM: The study aimed to provide a biological explanation for these 'inflated' exponents when modelling maximum oxygen uptake (max), based on the observations from this and previous studies that larger individuals develop disproportionately more muscle mass in the arms and legs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: A cross-sectional study of 119 professional soccer players from Croatia aged 18-34 was carried out. RESULTS: Here we confirm that the power function relationship between max and body mass of the professional soccer players results in an 'inflated' mass exponent of 0.75 (95% confidence interval from 0.56 to 0.93), but also the larger soccer players have disproportionately greater leg muscle girths. When the analysis was repeated incorporating the calf and thigh muscle girths rather than body mass as predictor variables, the analysis not only explained significantly more of the variance in max, but the sum of the exponents confirmed a surface-area law. CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm the pitfalls of fitting body-mass power laws and suggest using muscle-girth methodology as a more appropriate way to scale or normalize metabolic variables such as max for individuals of different body sizes.
Citation:
Annals of Human Biology, 31(4): 436-445
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/11119
DOI:
10.1080/03014460410001723996
PubMed ID:
15513694
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03014460410001723996; http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tandf/tahb/2004/00000031/00000004/art00006
Submitted date:
2007-03-14
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0301-4460
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Exercise and Health; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorMarkovic, G-
dc.contributor.authorVucetic, V-
dc.contributor.authorHolder, Roger L.-
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-05T11:02:50Z-
dc.date.available2007-04-05T11:02:50Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.date.submitted2007-03-14-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Human Biology, 31(4): 436-445en
dc.identifier.issn0301-4460-
dc.identifier.pmid15513694-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03014460410001723996-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/11119-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The power function relationship, MR = a.m(b), between metabolic rate (MR) and body mass m has been the source of much controversy amongst biologists for many years. Various studies have reported mass exponents (b) greater than the anticipated 'surface-area' exponent 0.67, often closer to 0.75 originally identified by Kleiber. AIM: The study aimed to provide a biological explanation for these 'inflated' exponents when modelling maximum oxygen uptake (max), based on the observations from this and previous studies that larger individuals develop disproportionately more muscle mass in the arms and legs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: A cross-sectional study of 119 professional soccer players from Croatia aged 18-34 was carried out. RESULTS: Here we confirm that the power function relationship between max and body mass of the professional soccer players results in an 'inflated' mass exponent of 0.75 (95% confidence interval from 0.56 to 0.93), but also the larger soccer players have disproportionately greater leg muscle girths. When the analysis was repeated incorporating the calf and thigh muscle girths rather than body mass as predictor variables, the analysis not only explained significantly more of the variance in max, but the sum of the exponents confirmed a surface-area law. CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm the pitfalls of fitting body-mass power laws and suggest using muscle-girth methodology as a more appropriate way to scale or normalize metabolic variables such as max for individuals of different body sizes.en
dc.format.extent129225 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03014460410001723996en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tandf/tahb/2004/00000031/00000004/art00006en
dc.subjectMuscularityen
dc.subjectLarger individualsen
dc.subjectMaximum oxygen uptakeen
dc.subjectSoccer playersen
dc.subjectFootball playersen
dc.subjectCroatiaen
dc.titleCan greater muscularity in larger individuals resolve the 3/4 power-law controversy when modelling maximum oxygen uptake?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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