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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance > Modelling mood states in athletic performance

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107256
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Title: Modelling mood states in athletic performance
Authors: Cockerill, I. M.
Nevill, Alan M.
Lyons, Noel
Citation: Journal of Sports Sciences, 9(2): 205-212
Publisher: Routledge
Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date: 1991
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107256
PubMed ID: 1895356
Additional Links: http://www.swetswise.com/link/access_db?issn=0264-0414&mode=A_MLL
Abstract: Because moods are transitory emotional states that can be influenced by a range of personality and environmental factors, the notion that elite athletes will always tend to produce a so-called iceberg profile of mood, and that less successful performers will not, is open to question. Evidence for such a claim is based principally upon descriptive studies. The present experiment used the POMS inventory as a predictor of cross-country running performance among a group of experienced male athletes. Race times from two competitive events were plotted against each of six mood factors. Using data from race 1, a multiple-regression model - incorporating the interdependence of tension, anger and depression - was able to predict rank order of finishing positions for race 2 with acceptable accuracy (rs = 0.74, P <0.01). The present approach differs from the traditional model of mood research in sport in that it provides a prescriptive, rather than a descriptive, focus. Although the model that has been developed appears promising, it is likely that in sports where demands on athletes are very different from those made upon cross-country runners, an alternative model may be required.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Mood
Cross-country running
Performance prediction
Multiple regression
Modelling
ISSN: 0264-0414
EISSN: 1466-447x
Appears in Collections: Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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