2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107256
Title:
Modelling mood states in athletic performance
Authors:
Cockerill, I. M.; Nevill, Alan M.; Lyons, Noel
Abstract:
Because moods are transitory emotional states that can be influenced by a range of personality and environmental factors, the notion that elite athletes will always tend to produce a so-called iceberg profile of mood, and that less successful performers will not, is open to question. Evidence for such a claim is based principally upon descriptive studies. The present experiment used the POMS inventory as a predictor of cross-country running performance among a group of experienced male athletes. Race times from two competitive events were plotted against each of six mood factors. Using data from race 1, a multiple-regression model - incorporating the interdependence of tension, anger and depression - was able to predict rank order of finishing positions for race 2 with acceptable accuracy (rs = 0.74, P <0.01). The present approach differs from the traditional model of mood research in sport in that it provides a prescriptive, rather than a descriptive, focus. Although the model that has been developed appears promising, it is likely that in sports where demands on athletes are very different from those made upon cross-country runners, an alternative model may be required.
Citation:
Journal of Sports Sciences, 9(2): 205-212
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date:
1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107256
PubMed ID:
1895356
Additional Links:
http://www.swetswise.com/link/access_db?issn=0264-0414&mode=A_MLL
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0264-0414
EISSN:
1466-447x
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCockerill, I. M.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Noelen
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-06T09:26:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-06T09:26:25Z-
dc.date.issued1991-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Sciences, 9(2): 205-212en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414-
dc.identifier.pmid1895356-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/107256-
dc.description.abstractBecause moods are transitory emotional states that can be influenced by a range of personality and environmental factors, the notion that elite athletes will always tend to produce a so-called iceberg profile of mood, and that less successful performers will not, is open to question. Evidence for such a claim is based principally upon descriptive studies. The present experiment used the POMS inventory as a predictor of cross-country running performance among a group of experienced male athletes. Race times from two competitive events were plotted against each of six mood factors. Using data from race 1, a multiple-regression model - incorporating the interdependence of tension, anger and depression - was able to predict rank order of finishing positions for race 2 with acceptable accuracy (rs = 0.74, P <0.01). The present approach differs from the traditional model of mood research in sport in that it provides a prescriptive, rather than a descriptive, focus. Although the model that has been developed appears promising, it is likely that in sports where demands on athletes are very different from those made upon cross-country runners, an alternative model may be required.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.swetswise.com/link/access_db?issn=0264-0414&mode=A_MLLen
dc.subjectMooden
dc.subjectCross-country runningen
dc.subjectPerformance predictionen
dc.subjectMultiple regressionen
dc.subjectModellingen
dc.titleModelling mood states in athletic performanceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1466-447x-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
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