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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance > Adjusting athletes' body mass index to better reflect adiposity in epidemiological research.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107236
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Title: Adjusting athletes' body mass index to better reflect adiposity in epidemiological research.
Authors: Nevill, Alan M.
Winter, Edward M.
Ingham, Steve
Watts, Adam
Metsios, Giorgos S.
Stewart, Arthur D.
Affiliation: Research Institute of Healthcare Sciences, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall.
Citation: Journal of Sports Sciences, First published on: 07 June 2010 (iFirst)
Publisher: Routledge
Journal: Journal of sports sciences
Issue Date: 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107236
DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2010.487071
PubMed ID: 20544485
Abstract: The aim of the present study was to identify when body mass index (BMI) is unlikely to be a valid measure of adiposity in athletic populations and to propose a simple adjustment that will allow the BMI of athletes to reflect the adiposity normally associated with non-athletic populations. Using data from three previously published studies containing 236 athletes from seven sports and 293 age-matched controls, the association between adiposity (sum of 4 skinfold thicknesses, in millimetres) and BMI was explored using correlation, linear regression, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). As anticipated, there were strong positive correlations (r = 0.83 for both men and women) and slope parameters between adiposity and BMI in age-matched controls from Study 1 (all P < 0.001). The standard of sport participation reduced these associations. Of the correlations and linear-regression slope parameters between adiposity and BMI in the sports from Studies 2 and 3, although still positive in most groups, less than half of the correlations and slope parameters were statistically significant. When data from the three studies were combined, the ANCOVA identified that the BMI slope parameter of controls (5.81 mm . (kg . m(-2))(-1)) was greater than the BMI slope parameter for sports (2.62 mm . (kg . m(-2))(-1)) and middle-distance runners (0.94 mm . (kg . m(-2))(-1)) (P < 0.001). Based on these contrasting associations, we calculated how the BMI of athletes can be adjusted to reflect the same adiposity associated with age-matched controls. This simple adjustment allows the BMI of athletes and non-athletes to be used with greater confidence when investigating the effect of BMI as a risk factor in epidemiological research.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: iFirst article (Epub ahead of print)
Keywords: Adiposity
Obesity
Body mass index
Body composition
Sport
Athletes
Slope parameters
Skinfold thickness
ISSN: 0264-0414
EISSN: 1466-447X
Appears in Collections: Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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