Biological markers of cardiac damage are not related to measures of cardiac systolic and diastolic function using cardiovascular magnetic resonance and echocardiography after an acute bout of prolonged endurance exercise.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107235
Title:
Biological markers of cardiac damage are not related to measures of cardiac systolic and diastolic function using cardiovascular magnetic resonance and echocardiography after an acute bout of prolonged endurance exercise.
Authors:
Wilson, Mathew; O'Hanlon, R.; Prasad, S.; Oxborough, D.; Godfrey, R.J.; Alpendurada, F; Smith, G.; Wong, J.; Basavarajaiah, S.; Sharma, S.; Nevill, Alan M.; Gaze, David; George, Keith; Whyte, Gregory P.
Abstract:
Objectives Seventeen male participants (mean (SD) (range): age 33.5 (6.5) years (46-26 years), body mass 80 (9.2) kg (100-63 kg), height 1.81 (0.06) m (1.93- 1.70 m)) ran a marathon to investigate the relationship between systolic function (using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)) and diastolic function (using echocardiography) against biomarkers of cardiac damage. Methods Echocardiographic and cardiac troponin I (cTnI)/N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) data were collected 24 h premarathon, immediately postmarathon and 6 h postmarathon. CMR data were collected 24 h premarathon and at 6 h postmarathon. Results Body mass was significantly reduced postmarathon (80 (9.2) vs 78.8 (8.6) kg; p<0.001). There was a significant E/A reduction postmarathon (1.11 (0.34) vs 1.72 (0.44); p<0.05) that remained depressed 6 h postmarathon (1.49 (0.43); p<0.05). CMR demonstrated left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were reduced postmarathon, with a preserved stroke volume. Left ventricular ejection fraction 6 h postmarathon significantly increased (64.4% (4.2%) vs 67.4% (5%); p<0.05). There were significant elevations in cTnI (0.00 vs 0.04 (0.03) mug/l; p<0.05) and NTproBNP (37.4 (24.15) ng/l vs 59.34 (43.3) ng/l; p<0.05) immediately postmarathon. Eight runners had cTnI elevations immediately postmarathon above acute myocardial infarction cutoff levels (>/=0.03 mug/l). No correlations between cTnI/NTproBNP and measures of diastolic function (E, A, E/A, isovolumic relaxation time, E deceleration time and E/E') or measures of systolic function (stroke volume or ejection fraction) were observed immediately postmarathon or 6 h postmarathon. Conclusions Biomarkers of cardiac damage after prolonged exercise are not associated with either systolic or diastolic functional measures.
Affiliation:
Research Centre of Sport and Exercise Performance, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall, UK.
Citation:
British journal of sports medicine, Published Online First 23 October 2009
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing
Journal:
British journal of sports medicine
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/107235
DOI:
10.1136/bjsm.2009.064089
PubMed ID:
19854761
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Epub ahead of print
ISSN:
0306-3674
EISSN:
1473-0480
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Mathewen
dc.contributor.authorO'Hanlon, R.en
dc.contributor.authorPrasad, S.en
dc.contributor.authorOxborough, D.en
dc.contributor.authorGodfrey, R.J.en
dc.contributor.authorAlpendurada, Fen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, G.en
dc.contributor.authorWong, J.en
dc.contributor.authorBasavarajaiah, S.en
dc.contributor.authorSharma, S.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorGaze, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, Gregory P.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-06T09:18:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-06T09:18:26Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationBritish journal of sports medicine, Published Online First 23 October 2009en
dc.identifier.issn0306-3674-
dc.identifier.pmid19854761-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsm.2009.064089-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/107235-
dc.descriptionEpub ahead of printen
dc.description.abstractObjectives Seventeen male participants (mean (SD) (range): age 33.5 (6.5) years (46-26 years), body mass 80 (9.2) kg (100-63 kg), height 1.81 (0.06) m (1.93- 1.70 m)) ran a marathon to investigate the relationship between systolic function (using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)) and diastolic function (using echocardiography) against biomarkers of cardiac damage. Methods Echocardiographic and cardiac troponin I (cTnI)/N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) data were collected 24 h premarathon, immediately postmarathon and 6 h postmarathon. CMR data were collected 24 h premarathon and at 6 h postmarathon. Results Body mass was significantly reduced postmarathon (80 (9.2) vs 78.8 (8.6) kg; p<0.001). There was a significant E/A reduction postmarathon (1.11 (0.34) vs 1.72 (0.44); p<0.05) that remained depressed 6 h postmarathon (1.49 (0.43); p<0.05). CMR demonstrated left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were reduced postmarathon, with a preserved stroke volume. Left ventricular ejection fraction 6 h postmarathon significantly increased (64.4% (4.2%) vs 67.4% (5%); p<0.05). There were significant elevations in cTnI (0.00 vs 0.04 (0.03) mug/l; p<0.05) and NTproBNP (37.4 (24.15) ng/l vs 59.34 (43.3) ng/l; p<0.05) immediately postmarathon. Eight runners had cTnI elevations immediately postmarathon above acute myocardial infarction cutoff levels (>/=0.03 mug/l). No correlations between cTnI/NTproBNP and measures of diastolic function (E, A, E/A, isovolumic relaxation time, E deceleration time and E/E') or measures of systolic function (stroke volume or ejection fraction) were observed immediately postmarathon or 6 h postmarathon. Conclusions Biomarkers of cardiac damage after prolonged exercise are not associated with either systolic or diastolic functional measures.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishingen
dc.titleBiological markers of cardiac damage are not related to measures of cardiac systolic and diastolic function using cardiovascular magnetic resonance and echocardiography after an acute bout of prolonged endurance exercise.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1473-0480-
dc.contributor.departmentResearch Centre of Sport and Exercise Performance, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of sports medicineen

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