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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Dance Science > Body composition and ballet injuries: a preliminary study

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/106657
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Title: Body composition and ballet injuries: a preliminary study
Authors: Twitchett, Emily
Angioi, Manuela
Metsios, Giorgos S.
Koutedakis, Yiannis
Wyon, Matthew A.
Citation: Medical Problems of Performing Artists, 23(3): 93–98.
Publisher: Hanley & Belfus, Inc
Journal: Medical Problems of Performing Artists
Issue Date: 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/106657
Additional Links: http://www.sciandmed.com/mppa/journalviewer.aspx?issue=1177&article=1751&action=3&search=true#abstract
Abstract: To date, the effects of body composition on injury occurrence and healing times in dancers have received limited scientific attention. The aim of the current study was to determine possible associations between somatotype, percent body fat, and self-reported injury characteristics in dance students. Forty-two full-time ballet students (11 male, 31 female) from two vocational dance schools volunteered for the study. The Heath-Carter protocol and Siri equation were adopted to calculate somatotype and percent body fat (%BF), respectively. Injury types, together with the time taken to recover from injury, were assessed using a recall injury questionnaire. Results revealed that the sample was classified as balanced-mesomorph somatotype (endomorphy – mesomorphy – ectomorphy = 3.4±0.9 – 3.9±1.4 – 3.2±1.2). Ectomorphy was a strong predictor of the number of acute injuries sustained (F1,36 = 5.4, p = 0.026); these parameters also revealed a significant negative correlation (r = –0.37, p = 0.016). Significant negative correlations were observed between the dancers’ total time off due to injury and %BF (r = –0.31, p = 0.048) and between the total time off resulting from acute injury and both %BF (r = –0.32, p = 0.04) and ectomorphy (r = –0.42, p = 0.005). The number of overuse injuries sustained and time off due to overuse injury also were correlated with mesomorphy (r = –0.38, p = 0.015 and r = –0.33, p = 0.032, respectively). It was concluded that high ectomorphy ratings, low %BF values, and low mesomorphy ratings are linked to injury. More relevant research is required on dancers from different genres.
Type: Article
Language: en
ISSN: 0885-1158
Appears in Collections: Dance Science

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