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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Dance Science > The effects of rest and subsequent training on selected physiological parameters in professional female classical dancers.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/106638
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Title: The effects of rest and subsequent training on selected physiological parameters in professional female classical dancers.
Authors: Koutedakis, Yiannis
Myszkewycz, Lynn
Soulas, D.
Papapostolou, V.
Sullivan, I.
Sharp, N. C. Craig
Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, Wolverhampton University, UK. y.koutedakis@uth.gr
Citation: International journal of sports medicine, 20(6): 379-83
Publisher: Georg Thieme
Journal: International journal of sports medicine
Issue Date: 1999
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/106638
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-971148
PubMed ID: 10496117
Additional Links: https://www.thieme-connect.de/ejournals/abstract/sportsmed/doi/10.1055/s-2007-971148
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a six-week summer break and of dance preparations at the beginning of the new season following the break, on selected physiological parameters. Seventeen professional ballerinas (mean age 27.2 +/- 1.4 years, mean height 160.2 +/- 6.2 cm) volunteered. They were assessed just before and immediately after their normal summer break, during which very little or no physical work was reported. Eight of these dancers were assessed for a third time, 2-3 months after the end of the break, while they were into preparing for the new season. More specifically, compared to pre-break data, the six-weeks of holiday was followed by a 15% overall increase in the three flexibility tests (from 334 to 386 degrees, P < 0.01), a 14% increase in peak anaerobic power (from 350 to 400 watts; P < 0.01), a 16% increase in leg strength (from 143 to 166 Nm; P < 0.01) (i.e. the mean performance of left and right knee extension added to the mean performance of left and right knee flexion), and a 10% increase in VO2max (from 41.2 to 45.2 ml/kg/min; P < 0.05). The third set of data, 2-3 months after the end of the break, revealed further significant increases by 24% in leg-strength (P < 0.005) and 17% in VO2max (P < 0.01) compared to pre-holiday data. Despite the lack of a control group, the present results fit with the hypothesis of a degree of "burnout" at the end of the season, which negatively affected the mechanisms of fitness and conditioning. A six-week summer-break can act as a restorer of these mechanisms. Two to three months into the new season, positive adaptations to exercise appeared to confirm recovery from the "burnout" or overtraining phenomenon. More research is required on the effects of demanding dance schedules on fitness and conditioning, and how such schedules might adversely affect dance performance and dancers' careers.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Classical dance
Overtraining
Detraining
Estimated body fat
Flexibility
Wingate test
Isokinetic dynamometry
Treadmill ergometry
MeSH: Adult
Dancing
Female
Humans
Muscle, Skeletal
Physical Fitness
Pliability
Range of Motion, Articular
Rest
Time Factors
ISSN: 0172-4622
Appears in Collections: Dance Science

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