Thigh-muscles strength training, dance exercise, dynamometry, and anthropometry in professional ballerinas.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/106631
Title:
Thigh-muscles strength training, dance exercise, dynamometry, and anthropometry in professional ballerinas.
Authors:
Koutedakis, Yiannis; Sharp, N. C. Craig
Abstract:
The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of 12 weeks of quadriceps and hamstring strength training on torque levels after a dance exercise and on selected anthropometric parameters. The sample consisted of 22 (ages, 25 +/- 1.3 years) full-time professional ballerinas who were randomly assigned into experimental (n = 12) and control (n = 10) groups. A dance routine designed to cause fatigue within 5 minutes, isokinetic dynamometry, and anthropometric assessments were conducted before and after strength training in both groups. Before strength training, the dance routine resulted in significant reductions of hamstring (p < 0.001) and quadriceps (p < 0.001) peak torques in both subject groups. However, after strength training, only control subjects demonstrated such torque decrements (p < 0.001) after the dance routine. Furthermore, the experimental group revealed greater knee extension (119 vs. 138 N.m; p < 0.001) and flexion (60 vs. 69 N.m; p < 0.001) torques, smaller sum of skinfolds (33.6 vs. 27.8 mm; p < 0.01), more fat-free mass (37.7 vs. 39.4 kg; p < 0.05), but unchanged body mass (p > 0.05) and thigh circumferences (p > 0.05). A negative relationship (p < 0.001) was found between initial strength levels and improvements measured at the end of the 12-week program. These results suggest that supplementary strength training for hamstring and quadriceps muscles is beneficial to professional ballerinas and their dancing; weaker individuals are more likely to benefit from such regimens than their stronger counterparts, whereas increases in thigh-muscle strength do not alter selected aesthetic components.
Affiliation:
School of Sport, Performing Arts, and Leisure, University of Wolverhampton, West Midlands, United Kingdom. y.koutedakis@uth.gr
Citation:
Journal of strength and conditioning research, 18 (4): 714-8
Publisher:
Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.
Journal:
Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/106631
DOI:
10.1519/13983.1
PubMed ID:
15574072
Additional Links:
http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2004/11000/Thigh_Muscles_Strength_Training,Dance.5.aspx
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1064-8011
Appears in Collections:
Dance Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.contributor.authorSharp, N. C. Craigen
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-22T11:51:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-22T11:51:42Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of strength and conditioning research, 18 (4): 714-8en
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011-
dc.identifier.pmid15574072-
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/13983.1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/106631-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of 12 weeks of quadriceps and hamstring strength training on torque levels after a dance exercise and on selected anthropometric parameters. The sample consisted of 22 (ages, 25 +/- 1.3 years) full-time professional ballerinas who were randomly assigned into experimental (n = 12) and control (n = 10) groups. A dance routine designed to cause fatigue within 5 minutes, isokinetic dynamometry, and anthropometric assessments were conducted before and after strength training in both groups. Before strength training, the dance routine resulted in significant reductions of hamstring (p < 0.001) and quadriceps (p < 0.001) peak torques in both subject groups. However, after strength training, only control subjects demonstrated such torque decrements (p < 0.001) after the dance routine. Furthermore, the experimental group revealed greater knee extension (119 vs. 138 N.m; p < 0.001) and flexion (60 vs. 69 N.m; p < 0.001) torques, smaller sum of skinfolds (33.6 vs. 27.8 mm; p < 0.01), more fat-free mass (37.7 vs. 39.4 kg; p < 0.05), but unchanged body mass (p > 0.05) and thigh circumferences (p > 0.05). A negative relationship (p < 0.001) was found between initial strength levels and improvements measured at the end of the 12-week program. These results suggest that supplementary strength training for hamstring and quadriceps muscles is beneficial to professional ballerinas and their dancing; weaker individuals are more likely to benefit from such regimens than their stronger counterparts, whereas increases in thigh-muscle strength do not alter selected aesthetic components.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics Publishers, Inc.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2004/11000/Thigh_Muscles_Strength_Training,Dance.5.aspxen
dc.subjectHamstringsen
dc.subjectQuadricepsen
dc.subjectBody weighten
dc.subjectSum of skinfoldsen
dc.subjectThigh circumferencesen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.meshAnthropometryen
dc.subject.meshBiomechanicsen
dc.subject.meshDancingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Education and Trainingen
dc.subject.meshThighen
dc.subject.meshTorqueen
dc.titleThigh-muscles strength training, dance exercise, dynamometry, and anthropometry in professional ballerinas.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Sport, Performing Arts, and Leisure, University of Wolverhampton, West Midlands, United Kingdom. y.koutedakis@uth.gren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen

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